Goodness and Advice



Goodness and AdviceHow Should We Live What Do We Owe To Other People In Goodness And Advice, The Eminent Philosopher Judith Jarvis Thomson Explores How We Should Go About Answering Such Fundamental Questions In Doing So, She Makes Major Advances In Moral Philosophy, Pointing To Some Deep Problems For Influential Moral Theories And Describing The Structure Of A New And Much Promising Theory Thomson Begins By Lamenting The Prevalence Of The Idea That There Is An Unbridgeable Gap Between Fact And Value That To Say Something Is Good, For Example, Is Not To State A Fact, But To Do Something Like Expressing An Attitude Or Feeling She Sets Out To Challenge This View, First By Assessing The Apparently Powerful Claims Of Consequentialism Thomson Makes The Striking Argument That This Familiar Theory Must Ultimately Fail Because Its Basic Requirement That People Should Act To Bring About The Most Good Is Meaningless It Rests On An Incoherent Conception Of Goodness, And Supplies, Not Mistaken Advice, But No Advice At All Thomson Then Outlines The Theory That She Thinks We Should Opt For Instead This Theory Says That No Acts Are, Simply, Good An Act Can At Most Be Good In One Or Another Way As, For Example, Good For Smith Or For Jones What We Ought To Do Is, Most Importantly, To Avoid Injustice And Whether An Act Is Unjust Is A Function Both Of The Rights Of Those Affected, Including The Agent, And Of How Good Or Bad The Act Is For Them The Book, Which Originated In The Tanner Lectures That Thomson Delivered At Princeton University S Center For Human Values In 1999, Includes Two Chapters By Thomson Goodness And Advice , Provocative Comments By Four Prominent Scholars Martha Nussbaum, Jerome Schneewind, Philip Fisher, And Barbara Herrnstein Smith And Replies By Thomson To Those Comments.

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➿ Goodness and Advice Free ➶ Author Judith Jarvis Thomson – Bluevapours.co.uk
  • Hardcover
  • 144 pages
  • Goodness and Advice
  • Judith Jarvis Thomson
  • English
  • 10 March 2017
  • 0691086737

10 thoughts on “Goodness and Advice

  1. Sharad Pandian says:

    If there was a ever a book that revealed the impoverished state of parts of analytic moral philosophy, this is it.Judith Jarvis Thomson of dying pianist hooked to your back argument for abortion fame starts off by arguing for a certain view of moral theories Her big idea is that when Consequentialists talk about how being moral is to maximize the most good for the most people, their position is meaningless Goodness or badness only makes sense with respect to a certain person, and so to attem If there was a ever a book that revealed the impoverished state of parts of analytic moral philosophy, this is it.Judith Jarvis Thomson of dying pianist hooked to your back argument for abortion fame starts off by arguing for a certain view of moral theories Her big idea is that when Consequentialists talk about how being moral is to maximize the most good for the most people, their position is meaningless Goodness or badness only makes sense with respect to a certain person, and so to attempt to aggregate goodness is illegitimate abstraction She rejects hedonism and Moorean consequentialism and presents features of her preferred account.We then have four commentaries on her essay two by Philosophers and two by professors in English departments The Philosophers provide some standard input and some interesting questions are raised So far, same ol same ol yawn But the English professors refuse to kowtow to standard philosophical pieties and launch radical assaults on the very methodology Thomson employs For instance, Philip Fisher asks whether generating principles by thinking about consequences of abstracted actions is necessarily the point of entry we should choose when thinking about human morality, while Barbara Herrnstein Smith questions why we place an inordinate amount of importance on the unsurprising convergence of intuitions of a narrow demographic of culturally narrowly conceived similar people.These sorts of questions potentially undermine the very fundamentals of how a lot of standard analytic moral philosophy is done, but Thomson doesn t seem to get this In her response to the commentary, she seems to think the criticism is just about her dealing with easy cases instead of contentious issues like abortion Thomson is clearly very good in her comfort zone, but by sticking there she misses an opportunity to really push moral philosophy outside the neat but suffocating boundaries it has drawn for itself

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