Return To Thebes

Return To Thebes❮PDF❯ ✯ Return To Thebes ⚣ Author Allen Drury – Bluevapours.co.uk EGYPTIn BC, it was a civilization both advanced and overripe For three millennia it had endured now the corruption of its gods, the seeds of internal rebellion, and the mad dreams of a King threatene EGYPTInBC, it was a civilization both advanced and overripe For three millennia it had endured now the corruption of its gods, the seeds of internal rebellion, and Return To PDF/EPUB ² the mad dreams of a King threatened to topple the Royal House of Thebes and the golden empire they dominated.

In late , Allen Drury was a year old army veteran looking for work A position as the US Senate correspondent for United Press International provided Return To PDF/EPUB ² him not only with employment, but with insider knowledge of the Senate In addition to fulfilling his duties as a reporter, he kept a journal of his views of the Senate individual senators In addition to the Senate personalities, his journal captured the events of the th th Congresses Altho written in the mid s, his diary was not published until A Senate Journal found an audience in part because of the great success of Advise Consent , his novel about the Senate s consideration of a controversial nominee for Secretary of State His greatest success was Advise Consent , which was made into a film in The book was partly inspired by the suicide of Wyoming Senator Lester C Hunt It spent weeks on the NY Times best seller list Advise Consent led to several sequels A Shade of Difference is set a year later Drury then turned his attention to the next presidential election after those events with Capable of Honor Preserve Protect He then wrote two alternative sequels based on a different outcome of an assassination attack in an earlier work Come Nineveh, Come Tyre The Promise of Joy In , he published The Throne of Saturn , a sf novel about the st attempt at sending a manned mission to Mars He dedicated the work To the US Astronauts those who help them fly Political characters in the book are archetypal rather than comfortably human The book carries a strong anti communist flavor The book has a lot to say about interference in the space program by leftist Americans Having wrapped up his political series by , Drury began a new one with the novel Anna Hastings ,about journalism than politics He returned to the timeline in , with the political novel Mark Coffin USS tho the main relationship between the two books was that Hastings was a minor character in Mark Coffin USS s sequels It was succeeded, by the two part The Hill of Summer The Roads of Earth , which are true sequels to Mark Coffin USS He also wrote stand alone novels, Decision Pentagon , as well as several other fiction non fiction works His political novels have been described as page turners, set against the Cold War, with an aggressive USSR seeking to undermine the USA Drury lived in Tiburon, CA from until his cardiac arrest He d completed his th novel, Public Men set at Stanford, just two weeks before his death He died on at St Mary s Medical Center in San Francisco, on his th birthday He never married Wikipedia edited.

Return To Thebes Kindle ê Return To  PDF/EPUB ²
  • Paperback
  • 319 pages
  • Return To Thebes
  • Allen Drury
  • English
  • 08 January 2017
  • 0440172969

10 thoughts on “Return To Thebes

  1. Lisa says:

    Return to Thebes is the second part of Allen Drury s two part series on Akhenaten and the Amarna period It s quite an interesting concept that Drury uses, where multiple points of view are used to narrate and drive the story It s something that I think can work really, really well with the forceful figures from the Amarna period and the peculiarities of the history I did feel like it was a step up from A God Against the Gods, because each POV feltactive and involved in the plot, rather Return to Thebes is the second part of Allen Drury s two part series on Akhenaten and the Amarna period It s quite an interesting concept that Drury uses, where multiple points of view are used to narrate and drive the story It s something that I think can work really, really well with the forceful figures from the Amarna period and the peculiarities of the history I did feel like it was a step up from A God Against the Gods, because each POV feltactive and involved in the plot, rather than just delivering exposition That said, at the start of Return to Thebes there were about 5 lengthy POV sections all telling us that these characters were going to have a meeting and that it was going to be significant before we actually had the meeting Published in the 1970s, the books show their age as far historical accuracy is concerned, and tend to follow the standard Amarna tropes or some of thefamous ones Keeping that in mind, the books are enjoyable but, for me, still lack the feeling of authenticity One of the things that I liked is that the two chief antagonists are so wildly different from each other, and Akhenaten inadvertently fashions his own downfall in Horemheb Granted, I found the characterisations tended to be heavy handed in showing how evil both Akhenaten and Horemheb were, but Drury also stepped back and allowed us to see the sympathetic or honourable side of these two at times Return to Thebes is a satisfying conclusion to Allen Drury s Amarna series, though one I have a few niggles with That said, I found it easy to sit back and enjoy the story for what it was

  2. Vicki Cline says:

    Akhenaten has become quite extreme in his worship of Aten and some powerful people in the court are trying to remove him, in particular Horemheb, who used to be his friend, but who believes he is destroying Egypt As in the previous book, the story is told by alternating narratives In particular I liked the ones by Amonemhet, a humble villager who shows up in a few surprising places The book has a sad, but expected, ending with the death of Tutankhamon Altogether these two books gave me a fee Akhenaten has become quite extreme in his worship of Aten and some powerful people in the court are trying to remove him, in particular Horemheb, who used to be his friend, but who believes he is destroying Egypt As in the previous book, the story is told by alternating narratives In particular I liked the ones by Amonemhet, a humble villager who shows up in a few surprising places The book has a sad, but expected, ending with the death of Tutankhamon Altogether these two books gave me a feeling of what life might have been like back then

  3. Lucy Beale Partridge says:

    Sheds a different light on my preconceived notions of exotic Egypt These folks were nutty and inane And fascinating There was nothing noble or patriotic about this family.

  4. Erik Graff says:

    I encountered this forgotten volume while going through the room within which reside my books of and about fiction Having recently read several nonfiction volumes about the 18th Dynasty I thought it might be interesting to supplement them with a imaginary reconstruction of the period, particularly seeing that author Drury had had help from a renowned and to me, familiar English Egyptologist.This is the second of two books The first, A God Against the Gods, details the rise of Akhenaten and N I encountered this forgotten volume while going through the room within which reside my books of and about fiction Having recently read several nonfiction volumes about the 18th Dynasty I thought it might be interesting to supplement them with a imaginary reconstruction of the period, particularly seeing that author Drury had had help from a renowned and to me, familiar English Egyptologist.This is the second of two books The first, A God Against the Gods, details the rise of Akhenaten and Nefertiti This one covers the end of his reign until the end of Horemheb s I have not seen the first volume, nor, happily, was it necessary to have read it beforehand.Drury treats his material through first person narratives, jumping from one mostly royal character to another The book is weak on description, strong on characterization Although there is no evidence for such a thing, Drury drives the narrative by the regnal ambitions of Horemheb, ambitions which lead to multiple murders and which provide a bit of suspense The struggle between the adherants of Amon and those of Aten was real enough, the murders are invention, albeit plausible ones

  5. Sarah Sammis says:

    I ve come to the conclusion that I really don t like books written from multiple points of view There are some absolutely compelling scenes hidden amongst the pretentiousness The worst written chapters are the ones from the servants points of view While I appreciate that Drury was probably trying to show their awe and reverence for the various nobility and royalty, the extra words spent on groveling and self deprecation turns simple thoughts and plot progressions into multiple page passages I ve come to the conclusion that I really don t like books written from multiple points of view There are some absolutely compelling scenes hidden amongst the pretentiousness The worst written chapters are the ones from the servants points of view While I appreciate that Drury was probably trying to show their awe and reverence for the various nobility and royalty, the extra words spent on groveling and self deprecation turns simple thoughts and plot progressions into multiple page passages of wasted words The book is much smoother if the servant scenes are skipped all together

  6. bkwurm says:

    The sequel to A God Against the Gods , this continues from where the earlier book left off and provides a compelling tale of how Akhenaten s reign might have ended and how the Eighteenth dynasty ended I would have liked it better if the author had not chosen to make Horemheb a member of the ruling family but understand that this was necessary for the story But still a good read despite recent evidence suggesting that Tutankamun might have died from an accident, rather than murder and DNA evid The sequel to A God Against the Gods , this continues from where the earlier book left off and provides a compelling tale of how Akhenaten s reign might have ended and how the Eighteenth dynasty ended I would have liked it better if the author had not chosen to make Horemheb a member of the ruling family but understand that this was necessary for the story But still a good read despite recent evidence suggesting that Tutankamun might have died from an accident, rather than murder and DNA evidence showing that he was Akhenaten s son, not brother

  7. Kristyn Jensen says:

    I got through this book in a matter of two days That to me is a good book This book Had a very clear villain, but from how it looks in history it made sense He created horemheb in a way that made me despise his character, which I believe was the author s intent Overall a very well written story.

  8. Lorraine says:

    Interesting perspective on Egyptian history, though hard to follow due to the author s use of many voices I think he is trying to indicate that this Pharaoh was trying to guide his people to the Judeo Christian Muslim God, but his intention is a bit murky.

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