Clarissa Harlowe; or the history of a young lady - Volume 1



Clarissa Harlowe; or the history of a young lady - Volume 1This Book Was Converted From Its Physical Edition To The Digital Format By A Community Of Volunteers You May Find It For Free On The Web Purchase Of The Kindle Edition Includes Wireless Delivery.

Samuel Richardson was a major English 18th century writer best known for his three epistolary novels Pamela Or, Virtue Rewarded 1740 , Clarissa Or the History of a Young Lady 1748 and Sir Charles Grandison 1753.Richardson had been an established printer and publisher for most of his life when, at the age of 51, he wrote his first novel and immediately became one of the most popular and admired writers of his time.

➯ Clarissa Harlowe; or the history of a young lady - Volume 1 Read ➸ Author Samuel Richardson – Bluevapours.co.uk
  • Kindle Edition
  • 225 pages
  • Clarissa Harlowe; or the history of a young lady - Volume 1
  • Samuel Richardson
  • English
  • 12 November 2019

10 thoughts on “Clarissa Harlowe; or the history of a young lady - Volume 1

  1. Jane Upshall says:

    I m actually quite surprised that I enjoyed this book I don t particularly like epistolary novels but this volume 1 was pretty impressive I had no idea when I started this classic that it was about 1400 pages long I breezed through it on LibriVox app Clarissa is causing some strife in this family saga for not wanting to marry the gentlemen that her parents and relatives are forcing upon her I have eight other volumes to get through so I will giveof a review when I ve completed all.

  2. VeganMedusa says:

    2133 pages, consisting of 536 letters plus conclusion and author s postscript all cross referenced the author must have been a madman A madman with an impressive filing system.This is the kind of book that draws you in slowly but completely, with not much happening most of the time So when something does happen, it s tremendously exciting My favourite scene from the whole book was at the end of Volume 2 when there was a fire and she opened her door dressed only in an under petticoat, he 2133 pages, consisting of 536 letters plus conclusion and author s postscript all cross referenced the author must have been a madman A madman with an impressive filing system.This is the kind of book that draws you in slowly but completely, with not much happening most of the time So when something does happen, it s tremendously exciting My favourite scene from the whole book was at the end of Volume 2 when there was a fire and she opened her door dressed only in an under petticoat, her lovely bosom half open, and he almost ravished her, but had a fit of conscience and couldn t do it Oh, the heaving of her bosom her ivory skin her dishevelled hair It s all still so clear in my mind.The main characters are all so likeable and distinct in their voices, so even though Clarissa is a pious, beautiful, can do no wrong and universally adored young lady which makes her the hardest character to like , and she took over 200 pages to die from lost virtue , and I spent that 200 pages saying Die already , and the next 200 pages mostly being about the survivors arguing about the will and will Morden and Lovelace duel or not , and despite this being a novel of instruction, designed to turn us all to a virtuous Christian life, I still enjoyed this story.A great conclusion, where everyone good is rewarded with a happy and long life, and everyone who ever did Clarissa any harm meets a nasty end, excepting her family who just lead miserable lives This about Polly Horton In short, as miss grew up under the influences of books so light and frothy, with the inflaming additions of music, concerts, operas, plays, assemblies, balls, drums, routs, and the rest of the rabble of amusements of modern life, it is no wonder that, like early fruit, she was soon ripened to the hand of the insidious gatherer Kids these days, I blame the opera The postscript is particularly funny too, as the author defends his story against criticisms, such as 1 That Clarissa is too perfect and couldn t possibly exist author maybe not in town, where ladies play cards and the like, but in the country young ladies of genteel families may compare.2 Clarissa shouldn t die Lovelace should reform and marry her author unlikely, not a good example to all the rakes out there to tell them to live a debauched life as long as they reform and marry at some point, and a whole look at the Greek tragedy.3 Lovelace and his friends should have been infidels author if he d been an unbeliever, she never would have seen any redeeming qualities in him to begin with, so could never have been tricked into running away with him.So, ponderous and slow but quite enjoyable really ETA How did I not know that this had been made into a series 1991 with Sean Bean as Lovelace I am watching it ASAP

  3. Laura Dam says:

    Did not finish at 40%.The longest novel in the English language I have been curious about this since 1994 when i saw it mentioned in one of my favourite books, Les Liaisons Dangereuses I have a weakness for 18th century epistolar novels, but this has proven too heavy of a burden I find it too tedious and repetitive I can t even finish the first installment, and there are 8to go I will read an abridged version instead.

  4. Nicole says:

    Ooookay so Volume 1 of 9 Here is a quick synopsis of nearly 200 pages Clarissa with the back of her hand pressed to her forehead in classically melodramatic style I shant I shant marry Mr Solmes Please just let me be single Various family members Why must you be so obstinate and spoiled You re locked in the house until you learn to obey Mr Lovelace lurks in the shadows and plots how he can conquer Clarissa, although her family despises him since he tried to kill her brother in a Ooookay so Volume 1 of 9 Here is a quick synopsis of nearly 200 pages Clarissa with the back of her hand pressed to her forehead in classically melodramatic style I shant I shant marry Mr Solmes Please just let me be single Various family members Why must you be so obstinate and spoiled You re locked in the house until you learn to obey Mr Lovelace lurks in the shadows and plots how he can conquer Clarissa, although her family despises him since he tried to kill her brother in a duel.Mr Solmes hovers on the edges of the plot and wrings his hands while he waits for the family to prevail in convincing Clarissa to marry him.For the first two thirds of the volume, Clarissa insists she has no interest in Mr Lovelace, only to inexplicably change her mind after he accosts her in the garden.In usual Richardson style, the story is presented in a series of letters written by Clarissa and various other characters it s a bit of a tedious format for a book this long Really, it s just tedious period I m hoping it gets better, but I m a good way into the second volume and not much has changed

  5. Kathleen Flynn says:

    Longer than War Peace, told entirely in letters, practically in real time It s like watching paint dry, onlydark, claustrophobic and creepy This is one of the most amazing books I have ever read, but not for the faint of heart Longer than War Peace, told entirely in letters, practically in real time It s like watching paint dry, onlydark, claustrophobic and creepy This is one of the most amazing books I have ever read, but not for the faint of heart

  6. Leah says:

    Epistolary novels require a certain amount of willing suspension of disbelief, and this one is no exception Clarissa s story is a tragic one that comes across at times like a morality play, and it definitely has some strong opinions about the characters within.

  7. Doina Condrea says:

    What can I say that hasn t been said before about the first volume of such a sad, but all too familiar story A woman that is treated like property to be traded to the highest bidder.

  8. Raoul says:

    Way too long for the current era, but I can imagine that this was quite popular when it was published in the mid 18th century I assume this was an effort by the author to convince young women of that era to marry as their parents desired or they would follow a similar fate as did Clarissa I really like the way the author used the series of letters to convey the story You just don t see that very often in current literature I read the first volume quite some time ago and then finally found th Way too long for the current era, but I can imagine that this was quite popular when it was published in the mid 18th century I assume this was an effort by the author to convince young women of that era to marry as their parents desired or they would follow a similar fate as did Clarissa I really like the way the author used the series of letters to convey the story You just don t see that very often in current literature I read the first volume quite some time ago and then finally found the last eight volumes on audio so I could listen while running

  9. Rosemary says:

    My goodness, she does witter on Admittedly she s young but really very silly too I will not be reading the other volumes at least, not at any foreseeable time However, Richardson does an amazing job of getting inside the head of his character.

  10. Corinna says:

    I m just so happy I finally finished it And I read the abridged version

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