Hooligan: A Mormon Boyhood




      Hooligan: A Mormon Boyhood
In the days before sunscreen, soccer practice, MTV, and Amber Alerts, boys roamed freely in the American West fishing, hunting, hiking, pausing to skinny dip in river or pond Douglas Thayer was such a boy In this poignant, often humorous memoir, he depicts his Utah Valley boyhood during the Great Depression and World War II.Known in some circles as a Mormon Hemingway, Thayer has created a richly detailed work that shares cultural DNA with Frank McCourt s Angela s Ashes,Mark Twain s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,and William Golding s Lord of the Flies. His narrative at once prosaic and poetic, Thayer captures nostalgia for a simpler time, along with boyhood s universal yearnings, pleasures, and mysteries. Free Download Kindle ePUB Hooligan: A Mormon Boyhood author Douglas Thayer – bluevapours.co.uk

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Hooligan: A Mormon Boyhood book, this is one of the most wanted Douglas Thayer author readers around the world.


      Hooligan: A Mormon Boyhood
 By Douglas Thayer IBN : 0978797159 Format : Paperback – bluevapours.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 196 pages
  • Hooligan: A Mormon Boyhood
  • Douglas Thayer
  • English
  • 15 November 2018
  • 0978797159

10 thoughts on “ Hooligan: A Mormon Boyhood

  1. Erin says:

    Interesting look into depression era Provo and Utah mormon culture It isn t a story as much as it is a series of memories and recollections Fun book club discussion with people who grew up in that same era, and couple who grew up in utah during similar times.

  2. Abby says:

    This won t be everyone s cup of tea but five stars for a fascinating history of Depression era Provo that made this Provoan happy, and a writing style that reminded me of my dad.

  3. Erin says:

    Since I first heard of this book, I wanted to read it I always take great delight in hearing about what my dad and his brothers did in their neighborhood growing up THAT was an interesting place so when I had the opportunity to get a copy of this myself from my grandma s home when she was moving, I gladly seized it I expected it to be very similar In a way, it was The boys in this story roam around outside unsupervised for hours on end, just like they did a generation later in my dad s tim Since I first heard of this book, I wanted to read it I always take great delight in hearing about what my dad and his brothers did in their neighborhood growing up THAT was an interesting place so when I had the opportunity to get a copy of this myself from my grandma s home when she was moving, I gladly seized it I expected it to be very similar In a way, it was The boys in this story roam around outside unsupervised for hours on end, just like they did a generation later in my dad s time But the tone is very different here than in my dad s tales, which emphasize the funny and ridiculous, while Mr Thayer adopts a very matter of fact, unsentimental voice This is how it was, and that s that, he seems to say Sometimes I liked that tone In many ways it seems well suited to a young boy with his rather limited, self absorbed view of his world At other times though, I wish we could have gotten a litt...

  4. Bryan Murdock says:

    My wife stumbled upon this book at the local library here in Salt Lake City, UT It s written by Douglas Thayer, who gew up in Provo, UT during the great depression and World War II, about his boyhood It s written in a sort of free association, stream of consciousness style the back cover compares it to Hemingway, and yes, I can see the resemblance It couldn t hold my wife s interest, but I finished it pretty quickly and I kind of can...

  5. Phoebe says:

    I think all of the Terrill kids that went to BYU had interactions with Dr Thayer I loved him as a professor and I enjoyed reading his childhood memoir I could just imagine his voice telling a few of the stories while I was reading It was easy to pick up and read in bits when I had a few minutes After reading it I kept comparing Thayer s childhood with my childhood and then with the childhood that my own kids are experiencing It is pretty amazing to see how drastically society has changed i I think all of the Terrill kids that went to BYU had interactions with Dr Thayer I loved him as a professor and I enjoyed reading his childhood memoir I could just imagine his voice telling a few of the stories while I was reading It was easy to pi...

  6. Karen says:

    I was particularly interested in this book because I am slightly acquainted with the author and live in his town I loved his detailed descriptions of the period, the location, and the cultural They all rang true to m...

  7. Cleo says:

    It was fun to read If you want a good memory jogger of what it was like in the old days this will be a treat It reads pretty much like a diary a boys adventures growing up in a rural town Since the town is a Mormon town some of the memories need a little understanding of the Mormon community and the church unique activities and administration Not a big point in our book club the ladies of other faiths enjoyed it als...

  8. David Harris says:

    This is an enjoyable book for anyone who grew up in Utah during the 1930s My parents, who are from Ogden and Logan, both found much that was familiar to them in the book, including memories of jumping up into the ice man s wagon for ice chips on hot summer days.I grew up in Provo in the 1970s right at the tail end of the era Thayer covers in this book, and I remember the downtown movie theaters, early...

  9. Alan Marchant says:

    Sorry to say, there s nothing here to review Hooligan covers exhaustively the Utah boyhood, in depression era Provo, of writer Douglas Thayer and is the flattest memoir that I have ever read Thayer grew up poor in a broken home, but the powerful ...

  10. James says:

    This memoir is truly a boy s story The narrator tells the story from a boy s point of view with vivid details and wonderful vignettes From the first page, where he comments We were to be seen and not heard , the narrative is filled with moments that resonated for me even though my own boyhood was much different than the author s I found the episodic style another aspect that made this like a boy s story for it seemednatural that he would tell it in this, somewhat unorganized, manner This memoir is truly a boy s story The narrator tells the story from a boy s point of view with vivid details and wonderful vignettes From the first page, where he comments We were to be seen and not heard , the narrative is filled with moments that resonated for me even though my own boyhood was much different than the author s I found the episodic style another aspect that made this like a boy s story for it seemednatural that he would tell it in this, somewhat unorganized, manner Nevertheless I looked forward to each chapter and the new events and information that it would bring The characters and events seemed real even when we learn few details about them.The me...

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