Hooligan: A Mormon Boyhood



Hooligan: A Mormon BoyhoodIn The Days Before Sunscreen, Soccer Practice, MTV, And Amber Alerts, Boys Roamed Freely In The American West Fishing, Hunting, Hiking, Pausing To Skinny Dip In River Or Pond Douglas Thayer Was Such A Boy In This Poignant, Often Humorous Memoir, He Depicts His Utah Valley Boyhood During The Great Depression And World War II.Known In Some Circles As A Mormon Hemingway, Thayer Has Created A Richly Detailed Work That Shares Cultural DNA With Frank McCourt S Angela S Ashes,Mark Twain S The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn,and William Golding S Lord Of The Flies His Narrative At Once Prosaic And Poetic, Thayer Captures Nostalgia For A Simpler Time, Along With Boyhood S Universal Yearnings, Pleasures, And Mysteries.

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Hooligan: A Mormon Boyhood book, this is one of the most wanted Douglas Thayer author readers around the world.

[PDF] Hooligan: A Mormon Boyhood By Douglas Thayer – Bluevapours.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 196 pages
  • Hooligan: A Mormon Boyhood
  • Douglas Thayer
  • English
  • 09 November 2019
  • 0978797159

10 thoughts on “Hooligan: A Mormon Boyhood

  1. Erin says:

    Since I first heard of this book, I wanted to read it I always take great delight in hearing about what my dad and his brothers did in their neighborhood growing up THAT was an interesting place so when I had the opportunity to get a copy of this myself from my grandma s home when she was moving, I gladly seized it I expected it to be very similar In a way, it was The boys in this story roam around outside unsupervised for hours on end, just like they did a generation later in my dad s tim Since I first heard of this book, I wanted to read it I always take great delight in hearing about what my dad and his brothers did in their neighborhood growing up THAT was an interesting place so when I had the opportunity to get a copy of this myself from my grandma s home when she was moving, I gladly seized it I expected it to be very similar In a way, it was The boys in this story roam around outside unsupervised for hours on end, just like they did a generation later in my dad s time But the tone is very different here than in my dad s tales, which emphasize the funny and ridiculous, while Mr Thayer adopts a very matter of fact, unsentimental voice This is how it was, and that s that, he seems to say Sometimes I liked that tone In many ways it seems well suited to a young boy with his rather limited, self absorbed view of his world At other times though, I wish we could have gotten a little somethingfrom him You feel this book islike a journalist s overview of the events, rather than a personal diary Anything not pertaining to hunting or fishing is not dwelt on long enough to get great detail, just the basic facts I found this tone especially strange when he explains parts of his religion briefly to his readers so they can better understand the culture of Great Depression era Provo He does a decent job of summarizing church things in a way non Mormons can understand easily and quickly, but again his tone is so unsentimental here that it makes you wonder why he tells you that his young boy self was so committed to the church at all The only reasons he gives, which I suspect he means to be ironic, are when he says things like he knew the church was true when the welfare program helped his family have enough food to eat I think there must beto it than that for him, but he never shows us that side of himself Again, this is the journalist viewpoint, not the diary It was certainly interesting to hear the descriptions of what my own hometown was like 80 years ago I was surprised actually at how many things that are still in Provo already existed then There have been some notable changes too, of course Luckily I don t think Provo is nearly as polluted now as it was then I also read some things about Utah lake I enjoyed, because they corroborated things I taught my students about the state of the lake It isn t often one gets to learn so much about the history of her own small hometown, at least not unless something really big in American history occurred there As one who has always been interested in history, and especially about what daily life was like at any given point in the past, this book was a real treat It was evenso when I thought about how my own grandmother grew up around this same era in this same place How I wish I had read this with her when she was still alive to add to the information in this book It would have enriched the reading experience for me tenfold As it was I found a couple bookmarks of hers between some pages Between pages 18 and 19 I spied a note, in her handwriting, referring the reader to page 90 Did she identify with something particular on these specific pages I eagerly skipped ahead to that page in search of the connection Though she had left a bookmark in that page as well, I admit I don t know how the contents of page 90 might have particularly related to her I don t envision her being the type that killed small critters and broke greenhouse windows with flippers, had BB gun wars with her naked friends, or made her own grenades out the contents of a vacuum cleaner bag, which is what the author is recollecting on page 90, so I ll admit that one has me feeling a bit mystified The fact that any of these boys survived childhood is a mystery, when it comes down to it They really were little hooligans

  2. Erin says:

    Interesting look into depression era Provo and Utah mormon culture It isn t a story as much as it is a series of memories and recollections Fun book club discussion with people who grew up in that same era, and couple who grew up in utah during similar times.

  3. Abby says:

    This won t be everyone s cup of tea but five stars for a fascinating history of Depression era Provo that made this Provoan happy, and a writing style that reminded me of my dad.

  4. Shauna says:

    I bought this book for my husband since I thought he would enjoy this memoir of a boy growing up in Utah who loved to fish, explore and write like my husband I ended up reading it first and enjoyed the author s descriptions of Provo as it is also my birthplace although four decades later BYU, the mountains, movies, and my home ward were huge parts of my childhood too.

  5. Bryan Murdock says:

    My wife stumbled upon this book at the local library here in Salt Lake City, UT It s written by Douglas Thayer, who gew up in Provo, UT during the great depression and World War II, about his boyhood It s written in a sort of free association, stream of consciousness style the back cover compares it to Hemingway, and yes, I can see the resemblance It couldn t hold my wife s interest, but I finished it pretty quickly and I kind of can t stop thinking about it It was very interesting to read My wife stumbled upon this book at the local library here in Salt Lake City, UT It s written by Douglas Thayer, who gew up in Provo, UT during the great depression and World War II, about his boyhood It s written in a sort of free association, stream of consciousness style the back cover compares it to Hemingway, and yes, I can see the resemblance It couldn t hold my wife s interest, but I finished it pretty quickly and I kind of can t stop thinking about it It was very interesting to read about life during that time in a familiar town, with the streets all still the same and some of the landmarks still there The amazing amount of freedom and unstructured time the boys had during that period is almost the complete opposite of what kids these days experience I feel like my childhood was pretty wild and free at times, but it was nothing compared to these kids skinny dipping in the Provo river, exploring the mountains with their.22s over their shoulders, and dreaming about the day they would join the army and become paratroopers Some of it made me want to move to a small town and let my kids roam free, and some of it made me very glad my kids aren t running around starting fires, shooting anything that moves, and throwing rocks at each other I don t know if I m explaining this well, but if you want a meandering glimpse into the history of Provo, UT or any small town during this time period, really, I d guess told through the eyes of an older man remembering his glorious boyhood, read this book

  6. Phoebe says:

    I think all of the Terrill kids that went to BYU had interactions with Dr Thayer I loved him as a professor and I enjoyed reading his childhood memoir I could just imagine his voice telling a few of the stories while I was reading It was easy to pick up and read in bits when I had a few minutes After reading it I kept comparing Thayer s childhood with my childhood and then with the childhood that my own kids are experiencing It is pretty amazing to see how drastically society has changed i I think all of the Terrill kids that went to BYU had interactions with Dr Thayer I loved him as a professor and I enjoyed reading his childhood memoir I could just imagine his voice telling a few of the stories while I was reading It was easy to pick up and read in bits when I had a few minutes After reading it I kept comparing Thayer s childhood with my childhood and then with the childhood that my own kids are experiencing It is pretty amazing to see how drastically society has changed in the last 60 years

  7. Karen says:

    I was particularly interested in this book because I am slightly acquainted with the author and live in his town I loved his detailed descriptions of the period, the location, and the cultural They all rang true to me I also believe he has made a honest attempt to describe his thoughts and feelings during those formative years with no hidden personal agenda.

  8. David Harris says:

    This is an enjoyable book for anyone who grew up in Utah during the 1930s My parents, who are from Ogden and Logan, both found much that was familiar to them in the book, including memories of jumping up into the ice man s wagon for ice chips on hot summer days.I grew up in Provo in the 1970s right at the tail end of the era Thayer covers in this book, and I remember the downtown movie theaters, early morning paper routes, and hiking and camping out up Rock Canyon with our pellet guns and.22s This is an enjoyable book for anyone who grew up in Utah during the 1930s My parents, who are from Ogden and Logan, both found much that was familiar to them in the book, including memories of jumping up into the ice man s wagon for ice chips on hot summer days.I grew up in Provo in the 1970s right at the tail end of the era Thayer covers in this book, and I remember the downtown movie theaters, early morning paper routes, and hiking and camping out up Rock Canyon with our pellet guns and.22s Things changed a lot in the 1980s when the effects of the University Mall on downtown Provo becameevident and again in the 1990s with the advent of the internet

  9. Cleo says:

    It was fun to read If you want a good memory jogger of what it was like in the old days this will be a treat It reads pretty much like a diary a boys adventures growing up in a rural town Since the town is a Mormon town some of the memories need a little understanding of the Mormon community and the church unique activities and administration Not a big point in our book club the ladies of other faiths enjoyed it also Rural history in the 1930 s was not so different across the US It app It was fun to read If you want a good memory jogger of what it was like in the old days this will be a treat It reads pretty much like a diary a boys adventures growing up in a rural town Since the town is a Mormon town some of the memories need a little understanding of the Mormon community and the church unique activities and administration Not a big point in our book club the ladies of other faiths enjoyed it also Rural history in the 1930 s was not so different across the US It appeals to the age group who remembers the 30 s and 40 s The young kids would probably not relate unless they had listed raptly to their elders

  10. Alan Marchant says:

    Sorry to say, there s nothing here to review Hooligan covers exhaustively the Utah boyhood, in depression era Provo, of writer Douglas Thayer and is the flattest memoir that I have ever read Thayer grew up poor in a broken home, but the powerful informal safety net in that Mormon community protected him from any significant tragedy, distress, or even unhappiness Thankfully the rest of the autobiography will never be written.

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