Duppy Talk: West Indian Tales of Mystery and Magic

Duppy Talk: West Indian Tales of Mystery and Magic❴PDF / Epub❵ ✅ Duppy Talk: West Indian Tales of Mystery and Magic Author Gerald Hausman – Bluevapours.co.uk This unusual collection of West Indian ghost stories brims with unforgettable charactersincluding duppies, those restless spirits who haunt the living Each story opens with a traditional proverb and c This unusual collection West Indian PDF Ê of West Indian ghost stories brims with unforgettable charactersincluding duppies, those restless spirits who haunt the living Each story opens with a traditional proverb and closes with a storyteller's note about the source of the tale Beautifully written and suspenseful, the stories provide a fascinating look at West Indian culture.

Gerald Andrews Hausman West Indian PDF Ê is a storyteller and award winning author of books about Native America, animals, mythology, and West Indian culture Hausman comes from a long line of storytellers and educators, and has published over seventy books for both children and adults.

Duppy Talk: West Indian Tales of Mystery and Magic Kindle
  • Hardcover
  • 102 pages
  • Duppy Talk: West Indian Tales of Mystery and Magic
  • Gerald Hausman
  • English
  • 20 February 2019
  • 9780671890001

14 thoughts on “Duppy Talk: West Indian Tales of Mystery and Magic

  1. Sam Smerbeck says:

    Title: Duppy Talk: West Indian Tales of Mystery and Magic
    Author: Gerald Hausman
    Illustrator: Gerald Hausman
    Genre: Non – European Folktale
    Theme(s): Supernatural, Ghost Magic
    Opening Line/Sentence:
    The legends of Duppy Talk – tales of magic power and mystic people – come from the great act of remembering
    Brief Book Summary:
    This book contains a set of seven short stories that are based upon ancient legends. Each one binds the roots of Africa to the Caribbean of today. All of the stories have been passed down generation to generation and focus on supernatural phenomena that happen to people.
    Professional Recommendation/Review #1:
    Janice Del Negro (Booklist, January 15, 1995 (Vol. 91, No. 10)) 
    Gathered from storytellers on the north coast of Jamaica, these six tales are built on legends brought from Africa to the Caribbean. Familiar motifs are shaped by local lore and history. The stories are linked by a storyteller's voice, which provides unobtrusive background and context. Although all the tales have supernatural or mystical elements, Chick Chick is the scariest. It's a truly skin-crawling account of a woman's physical and psychological duel with a vengeful duppy (a restless soul believed to haunt the living) sent by an evil obeah man. Each tale opens with a Jamaican proverb, and a final chapter (The Proverbs of Duppy Talk) discusses each saying's origin and meaning. The volume is attractively designed, with heavy, glossy pages, a generous amount of white space, and crisp black-and white chapter illustrations. There is also a strong glossary. The stories will be easy to booktalk and should have wide appeal across age and gender lines. Category: Middle Readers. 1994, Simon & Schuster, $14. Gr. 4-8. 
    (PUBLISHER: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers (New York:), PUBLISHED: c1994.
    Professional Recommendation/Review #2:
    Library Journal
    Hausman retells six tales that he learned in Jamaica, crediting his sources in a note after each one...the language has a Jamaican ring, the notes are informative, and the 11-page glossary explains unfamiliar terms. This is one of the very few collections of West Indian folklore available for children...a worthy addition.
    Response to Two Professional Reviews:
    Both reviews are very positive towards this set of folktales. They are suitable for children and one reviewer mentions how although all stories are supernatural in a sense, “Chick Chick” is the scariest one.
    Evaluation of Literary Elements: The stories themselves are not for a young age, I would probably begin reading this book in third grade. Anytime before this would be difficult and potentially scary. The few pictures provide good detail into what to expect in the chapter.
    Consideration of Instructional Application:
    This book could be placed in the classroom library, and perhaps I could do a read aloud of one story. The students and I could read aloud a story and give our opinions on if we thought it was true and why the story had been passed down so steadily.

  2. Jamila says:

    I came across this collection of folktales, because I couldn't find a collection of Carribbean folktales I was looking for. I will specify that these folktales are from Jamaica - despite what the title says, because the writer never mentioned any other country (and the Caribbean is a large collection of different nations and cultures, so let's just correct that shall we?)

    The first tale in the book was so typical I nearly put this one down - very much the man picks up a quiet strange and drops them off but they turn out to be ghosts (with a minor twist), except it's on a Caribbean island. I could find the same story in ANY urban legend book, so not a great start there, Mr. Folktale book.
    However, the rest of the stories were ones I'd never heard before and very interesting. It was nice to see how Jamaican folktales differed from Bajan and Guyanese folktales I was raised on as well as the cultural and language/patois differences.

    Worth a quick read through.

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