The Empress

The Empress❮PDF❯ ⚣ The Empress ✈ Author Laura Martínez-Belli – Bluevapours.co.uk It’s Napoleon III has installed a foreign monarch in Mexico to squash the current regime Maximilian von Habsburg of Austria accepts the emperor’s crown But it is his wife, the brilliant and ambit It’sNapoleon III has installed a foreign monarch in Mexico to squash the current regime Maximilian von Habsburg of Austria accepts the emperor’s crown But it is his wife, the brilliant and ambitious Princess Charlotte, who throws herself passionately into the role Known to the people as Empress Carlota, she rules deftly from behind the scenes while her husband contents himself with philandering and decorating the palaceBut Carlota bears a guilty secret Trapped in a loveless marriage, she’s thrown herself into a reckless affair Desire has blinded Carlota to its consequences, for it has left her vulnerable to her sole trusted confidante Carlota’s devious ladyinwaiting has political beliefs of her own—and they are strong enough to cause her to betray The Empress and join a plot to depose her from the throne As Carlota grows increasingly, maddeningly defenseless, both her own fate and that of the empire are at stakeA sweeping historical novel of forbidden love, dangerous secrets, courtly intrigue, and treachery, The Empress passionately reimagines the tragic romance and illfated reign of the most unforgettable royal couple of nineteenthcentury Europe during the last throes of the Second Empire.

Is a well known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Empress book, this is one of the most wanted Laura Martínez Belli author readers around the world.

Kindle Edition  ☆ The Empress PDF/EPUB ✓
  • Kindle Edition
  • 402 pages
  • The Empress
  • Laura Martínez-Belli
  • English
  • 14 June 2017

10 thoughts on “The Empress

  1. Janet says:

    When it is snowy and cold outside, superspeed readers like me can read 250+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. LOL

    I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exchange for an honest review.

    From a bestselling author in Mexico comes her English-language debut—an enthralling historical novel about the tragic reign of Empress Carlota of Mexico.

    It’s 1863. Napoleon III has installed a foreign monarch in Mexico to squash the current regime. Maximilian von Habsburg of Austria accepts the emperor’s crown. But it is his wife, the brilliant and ambitious Princess Charlotte, who throws herself passionately into the role. Known to the people as Empress Carlota, she rules deftly from behind the scenes while her husband contents himself with philandering and decorating the palace.

    But Carlota bears a guilty secret. Trapped in a loveless marriage, she’s thrown herself into a reckless affair. Desire has blinded Carlota to its consequences, for it has left her vulnerable to her sole trusted confidante. Carlota’s devious lady-in-waiting has political beliefs of her own—and they are strong enough to cause her to betray the empress and join a plot to depose her from the throne. As Carlota grows increasingly, maddeningly defenceless, both her own fate and that of the empire are at stake.

    A sweeping historical novel of forbidden love, dangerous secrets, courtly intrigue, and treachery, The Empress passionately reimagines the tragic romance and ill-fated reign of the most unforgettable royal couple of nineteenth-century Europe during the last throes of the Second Empire.

    It's Poppy here - I read this in Spanish when it first came out and recommended that Janet request it on Netgalley.., We want a review in English on Goodreads and here on Netgalley, so I am writing the review before she does.

    The book is a wonderful mix of history, drama and a very plucky woman making sure that her world does not implode or explode. Carlota is a force of nature to be reckoned with and I love her story here: it is gripping and exciting at the same time. It is not what I call a bodice ripper romance although there is romance in it - it is just a wonderful read that you should inhale whether it be in the original Spanish (the book is named Carlota or in English once it comes out this October.

  2. Amanda says:

    I am a huge fan of historical fiction so I was excited to read this one and it definitely didn't disappoint. The Empress is a sweeping historical fiction based on the life of Carlota, The Empress of Mexico.

    Through this novel we we learn the history of Princess Charlotte of Belgium who marry's Maximilian von Habsburg, the Archduke of Austria.at just 17 and how she becomes Carlota, The Empress.

    Napolean III wants to instil a Monarchy in Mexico after taking control of the country and Maximilian is pushed to take up this post. Charlotte is struggling in a loveless marriage and feeling isolated and frustrated and she believes the move to Mexico will be the the fresh start for herself and her husband. With the ambitious Charlotte's encouragement, Maximilian and Charlotte embark on the voyage to Mexico and are placed on the throne. They would now be known as Maximilian and Carlota, Emperor and Empress of Mexico.

    Life in Mexico becomes a constant frustration for Carlota. Her husband is constantly away dealing with trivial matters and rumours swirl that she is unable to bare children while her husband seems to prefer the company of men.

    Unrest is swirling around them and Napolean III refuses to hear Carlota's pleas for help, as it is she who is fighting to keep the monarchy alive in Mexico and trying to do what she believes is right for the Mexican people.

    What follows is a tragic story of betrayal by those closed to the Empress. We feel this amazingly strong and resilient woman lose her grip on reality as those around her seek to destroy her and all that she holds dear.

    The author does a spectacular job of entwining historical facts and timelines into the story and whilst at times I got a little confused by so many different characters appearing throughout the story, this was more from my own lack of knowledge of this period in time.

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book and it has left me wanting to learn more about The Empress Carlota and her life.

  3. Jamie Jack says:

    A Jumbled Timeline and Choppy Writing

    I have to say that I love the trend in historical novels of showing what happens “back then” through a woman's eyes. Even when women ruled, like Empress Carlota, much of what we hear and read about past times comes from a male perspective. So, it is refreshing to have this book look at the ill-fated reign of Empress Carlota and Emperor Maximilian of Mexico from her perspective; it would have been so very different if done from his! I appreciate that the author starts the book with a cast of characters and a list of places. While I didn't quite need the latter, the former was helpful in untangling similarly named people and their political beliefs and relationships to others. The timeline of the story itself did jump around a bit, which I think the author did so to help build suspense, but I think the story would have been better served (and the reader left less confused at times) if this hadn't happened. Different threads mostly came together in the end, but I felt like there were a few questions that were left unanswered and even perhaps a few plot holes. The writing itself didn't work for me on one level. I'm not a fan of using lots of short phrases in novel writing; I prefer full sentences most of the time with occasional lone prepositional phrases and subordinate clauses if the author sees fit. The sheer number of short phrases in this book made the writing feel choppy to me; there were simply way too many of them. I did enjoy the author's descriptions of Mexico. You can tell the author did a fair amount of research, which I always appreciate in a historical novel, but certainly much has been fictionalized. Not as good of a book as I had hoped it would be but still a decent read that made me interested to research more information about this time in Mexican history.

    I received a free copy of this book, but that did not affect my review.

  4. What Fern Reads says:

    The Empress begins with a list of characters and places that will be mentioned throughout the novel. I found this informative and a great reference point, as throughout reading I did have turn back to remember which character was which and so on.

    The foundations of Charlotte/Carlota’s life and displeasure of her marriage are laid early on and you instantly begin to feel for for this young woman who is married into a world unlike what she expected.
    The timelines of this novel jump significantly but all end up tying together - unlike traditional novels where a timeline flows from start to finish.

    Throughout The Empress there are in-depth perceptions of the women of the time, and their views surrounding Mexican and European politics and their everyday lives. One quote I highlighted was “A women wears many disguises, dear, to defend an idea. To survive. Mine is that of a self-sacrificing wife. There are nun, there are prostitutes, but we all choose what we want to be under the mask.”

    What I liked most about this novel was how the author managed to really show the reader how the characters were feeling. You can tell that both Carlota and Maximilian show an eagerness to rule and have ambition, but Carlota’s is much more clear. You can understand the love that Carlota has for her Mexico, the excitement that the young couple has for their own court, their own empire - far from everyone else.
    You can tell what Mexico looked like to a newcomer from distant lands and the beginning of Carlota’s madness.

    Though I did find some explanations of character’s backgrounds unnecessary to the novel, I found myself researching further into Carlota and Max’s family and their short lived reign.
    It speaks to me as historically accurate where needed and mixing a taste of fiction too.

    Highly recommended.

  5. Barbara says:

    Empress, a work of historical fiction, concerning Mexico and the second empire. The rulers of this empire was Maximillian an Archduke of Austria and a brother of the Emperor of Austria and Charlotte a princess of Belgium and cousin of Queen Victoria. Maximillian and Charlotte were invited by the French Emperor Napoleon III and the conservative party in Mexico to engage in a bit of empire building in the Americas and establish the second empire in Mexico. By doing this Max and Charlotte would become Emperor and Empress of Mexico and by extension lead busier and more fulfilling lives which up until then had been pretty aimless and boring. Çharlotte, trapped in a dynastic and lifeless marriage, really came into her own in Mexico, finding her strengths and her voice. I enjoyed her development in this novel. This book has a full cast of charecters, some historical and some not, that support Max and Charlotte on their ill fated adventure and make for very good reading. I liked that the book concentrated on Charlotte and did not have too many characters as many historical novels do, trying to mention everyone involved plus a few made up ones, making it almost impossible to keep straight who is who unless you are already familiar with the history which I was not. I also liked the way the author mentioned What else was going on in the world at the time to orient to the time these events were taking place. What I did not like we're the flashbacks in time which I am not a fan of as I much prefer a straight forward story. I received this book from Netgalley in exchange for a review. The book captured my imagination and I read it in about two days. This book also has a bibliography if you wish to read more about Maximillian and Charlotte.

  6. Jenny says:

    The Empress is a story about a time of turbulence in Mexico and one of the solutions was to instate an European monarchy to give structure to Mexico and her citizens. The novel follows several viewpoints from both European and Mexican civilians and royalty. Martinex-Belli did a wonderful job of laying down a detailed, well-researched base. I felt like I could be in Mexico with all the characters and see the country side in my mind's eye. While fiction, the historical events were obviously well researched and kept as accurate as it could be. It was very easy to start caring about the characters as they were all three dimensional with emotions, conflict and growth.

    One little thing that bothered me was the jumping back and forth in the timeline. It always took me a few pages to realize what was going on and which part of the timeline I was currently reading. I can see why it was done that way to add to the suspense of the story line but even with that, there were questions that never really got answered in my opinion. I think it could've easily been written as one solid timeline.

    I would recommend it for any historical fiction reader. It is during the Victorian reign of England and Leopold I of Belgium. The majority of the story does take place in Mexico.

  7. Rachel says:

    The Empress by Laura Martinez-Belli is an excellent translated historical fiction featuring the tragic life and story of Carlota Empress of Mexico (Charlotte of Belgium).

    I have to admit, I did not make the association between Carlota and Charlotte, the daughter of King Leopold I of Belgium and his second wife. Of course, after reading this, I had to research as much as I could about this tragic woman. Life was difficult for any woman at this time, and Carlota had her work cut out for her. Unfortunately, there were so many external factors that were beyond her control, that helped add to her downfall.

    This is an excellent translation that was thoroughly engaging, easy to understand and follow, and kept my interest throughout. What more could one ask from a historical fiction novel?!

    5/5 stars

    Thank you NetGalley and AmazonCrossing for this ARC and in return I am submitting my unbiased and voluntary review and opinion.

    I am posting this review to my GR account immediately and will post it to my Amazon and B&N accounts upon publication.

  8. Eileen Kennedy says:

    Charlotte of Belgium and Maximilian of Austria are victims of history. Napoleon III appoints them as Emperor and Empress of Mexico in a bid to establish a European presence in the Americas. Regarded as outsiders from the start, the odds are against their being accepted by those they presume to rule. Nationalist rebels plot their demise. Charlotte and Maximilian are not married in the physical sense; both seek lovers. Despite this, she embarks on an arduous and fruitless journey to get financial and military aid for her husband from European leaders. Laura Martinez-Belli has written a fictional account of this woman, using historic figures, both those who pledge their lives to her and her husband and those who work against them. Circumstances leading to his assassination and her descent into madness, along with rumors of illegitimate children, are depicted. Readers are advised to pay close attention to the chapter dates provided.

  9. Debi Samuels says:

    I understand that historical accuracy and fiction are hard to combine, especially when you’re trying to stick to a timeline and out thoughts into historical characters heads. But this was boring. I struggled to get through it. When compared to books like Sisi that attempt to do the same it was a downright disappointment. I feel like if the author had tried to bend the timelines/characters a little outside their historical knowledge it A have been a much better book. The thoughts and historical actions just didn’t like up. The descriptions, background, and characters were all well written, and overall it was enjoyable but it wasn’t entertaining unless you enjoy reading history textbooks. It read like someone tried to shove a history textbook into a novel.

  10. Katie Mac says:

    I received an eARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

    Laura Martínez-Belli mostly succeeds in her daunting task of detailing the rise and downfall of Empress Carlota and Maximilian von Habsburg. I was impressed by the amount of historical details she managed to include as well as the side characters she inserted into the story; however, as other reviewers have mentioned, the lack of dialogue made it read more like a non-fiction textbook with fictional characters rather than as a work of historical fiction.

    While I got most of the way through the book, I was not in the right head space to finish it, unfortunately. I do, however, I think it would work really well for another lover of historical fiction.

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