Plants of the Pacific Northwest Coast: Washington, Oregon, British Columbia and Alaska

Plants of the Pacific Northwest Coast: Washington, Oregon, British Columbia and Alaska➥ [Ebook] ➠ Plants of the Pacific Northwest Coast: Washington, Oregon, British Columbia and Alaska By Jim Pojar ➯ – Bluevapours.co.uk This best selling field guide features species of trees, shrubs, wildflowers, aquatics, grasses, ferns, mosses and lichens found along the coast from Oregon to Alaska Color photographs and line drawi the Pacific PDF/EPUB ê This best selling field guide featuresspecies of trees, shrubs, wildflowers, aquatics, grasses, ferns, mosses and lichens found along the coast from Oregon to Alaska Color photographs and line drawings help you identify and learn about the fascinating plants of the Pacific Northwest coast Engaging notes on each species Plants of PDF or describe aboriginal and other local uses of plants for food, medicine and implements, along with the unique characteristics of each plant and name origins.

the Pacific PDF/EPUB ê Is a well known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Plants of the Pacific Northwest Coast: Washington, Oregon, British Columbia and Alaska book, this is one of the most wanted Jim Pojar author readers around the world.

Plants of the Pacific Northwest Coast: Washington, Oregon,
    iOS for the iPad is the biggest iOS release ever the fascinating plants of the Pacific Northwest coast Engaging notes on each species Plants of PDF or describe aboriginal and other local uses of plants for food, medicine and implements, along with the unique characteristics of each plant and name origins."/>
  • Paperback
  • 528 pages
  • Plants of the Pacific Northwest Coast: Washington, Oregon, British Columbia and Alaska
  • Jim Pojar
  • English
  • 15 June 2019
  • 1551050404

10 thoughts on “Plants of the Pacific Northwest Coast: Washington, Oregon, British Columbia and Alaska

  1. Karen Erdmann says:

    This is my go to book for all plants I find on the farm, in our woods and on my walks It gives a balance of identification, uses and local culture It will always occupy a prominent place on my current bookshelf and I will never be finished reading it.

  2. Lisa says:

    My only gripe with this book is that it does not include the scientific name of the family in the plant profiles.

  3. Kylie Stoneburner says:

    Have I read this cover to cover No But this is my go to guide for PNW plant ID While I was an undergraduate at the University of Washington, Bothell campus, this was my textbook in a number of nature and field based classes This is the text I learned to ID wetland and forest plants, in the winter by their buds no less I still have my Pojar on my shelf and frequently bring it along on camping trips or out to my mobile office at work in the field with WDFW I particularly love the dichotomo Have I read this cover to cover No But this is my go to guide for PNW plant ID While I was an undergraduate at the University of Washington, Bothell campus, this was my textbook in a number of nature and field based classes This is the text I learned to ID wetland and forest plants, in the winter by their buds no less I still have my Pojar on my shelf and frequently bring it along on camping trips or out to my mobile office at work in the field with WDFW I particularly love the dichotomous key for trees I also have a fond memory of frantically flipping to the page on snowberries after a classmate and I snuck a berry while touring plots in the wetland because we d heard they ferment on the vine At first we felt like Charlie and Grandpa Joe sneaking a sample in Willy Wonka s bubble soda room, until the classmates leading the tour mentioned that they were toxic I don t think I ve flipped through a book so fast, looking for the edible information on snowberries, worried I d just made a stupid mistake, to find out that aboriginals used to eat one or two berries to settle upset stomachs Relieved I wasn t about to die, and vowing to NEVER eat something in nature before doing my due diligence again, we scurried on to the next plot to catch up with the rest of the class

  4. Aileen says:

    These are my favorite field guides I learned about the Lone Pine field guides during my environmental science field camp during the summer of 2007 and got very enthusiastic about keying out plants Now I m in Alaska and have tried many resources to get to know the plants around here and this guide remains the best one It makes me want spring and summer so I can get outside and watch things grow

  5. Katie says:

    Excellent reference book for those who wish to hike with their encyclopedias A good cover of the PNW plants but not too heavy to bring along Nicely organized and even if I am totally unfamiliar with the plant I can find it pretty easily in the book Otherwise, I have read the book back to front several times looking for plants and enjoyed every minute of it.

  6. Leah says:

    Beautiful and informative.

  7. Robin says:

    This is my favorite field guide and I thoroughly geek out with it on every camping trip Highly recommended for anyone interested in local flora.

  8. Sally Anne says:

    indispensable Includes some ethnobotany.

  9. Degan Walters says:

    Great resource of our flora.

  10. Amber says:

    Legit the Alaskan Park Forest Ranger bible No seriouslythank God for this book lol

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