The Papacy, 1073 1198: Continuity and Innovation

The Papacy, 1073 1198: Continuity and Innovation[PDF / Epub] ✅ The Papacy, 1073 1198: Continuity and Innovation By I.S. Robinson – Bluevapours.co.uk Before the mid eleventh century the pope was far from being the active leader of the Roman Catholic Church that he is today he restricted himself to the local concerns of the diocese of Rome and was v 1073 1198: PDF ↠ Before the mid eleventh century the pope was far from being The Papacy, Kindle - the active leader of the Roman Catholic Church that he is today Papacy, 1073 1198: PDF Í he restricted himself to the local concerns of the diocese of Rome and was virtually ignored by the outside world This book is a study of the transformation of the role of the pope in the twelfth century, from which he emerged as monarch of the universal Church, dedicated to reform and to making the Church independent of secular control The most important role in the new model government was given to the cardinals, who hence forward were the principal advisers, agents and electors of the popes These developments were accelerated by schism and political conflict on three occasions the lawful pope was driven into exile by an antipope supported by a powerful secular ruler Professor Robinson s text emphasizes the growing importance of the College of Cardinals and the practical aspects of papal government It offers the most detailed analytical study yet available of this key period in the history of the western Church.

1073 1198: PDF ↠ Professor I S Robinson is Lecky Professor of History and Senior The Papacy, Kindle - Fellow of Trinity College, Dublin His research and publications have focused on Papacy, 1073 1198: PDF Í Papal and Imperial history in the medieval period.

The Papacy, 1073 1198: Continuity and Innovation Kindle
    The Papacy, 1073 1198: Continuity and Innovation Kindle and was virtually ignored by the outside world This book is a study of the transformation of the role of the pope in the twelfth century, from which he emerged as monarch of the universal Church, dedicated to reform and to making the Church independent of secular control The most important role in the new model government was given to the cardinals, who hence forward were the principal advisers, agents and electors of the popes These developments were accelerated by schism and political conflict on three occasions the lawful pope was driven into exile by an antipope supported by a powerful secular ruler Professor Robinson s text emphasizes the growing importance of the College of Cardinals and the practical aspects of papal government It offers the most detailed analytical study yet available of this key period in the history of the western Church."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 572 pages
  • The Papacy, 1073 1198: Continuity and Innovation
  • I.S. Robinson
  • English
  • 20 February 2019
  • 0521264987

10 thoughts on “The Papacy, 1073 1198: Continuity and Innovation

  1. Caidyn (BW Reviews; he/him/his) says:

    A dry, but interesting, read I was familiar with some of this because of the class I took on Europe in the high middle ages, but we only talked about a few parts of Church history Such as the Crusades which wasn t mentioned too much in here and Pope Gregory VII Those were the two big things we discussed in that class So, I m glad that I read this, but again, I need to dopapal reading before diving into something this big and broad Either way, it was a good read

  2. Katie says:

    4.5 stars Let s start with this I m a total pope nerd When Benedict XVI resigned earlier this year, it blew my mind. When a Jesuit subsequently became pope and chose the name Francis, it blew my mind again. It has been quite a year In light of that, it does not take very much for me to find a book about popes fascinating For a lot of people, this book will probably seem terribly dry it s nearly all institutional history, it dives head first into lots and lots of details, and at times it c 4.5 stars Let s start with this I m a total pope nerd When Benedict XVI resigned earlier this year, it blew my mind. When a Jesuit subsequently became pope and chose the name Francis, it blew my mind again. It has been quite a year In light of that, it does not take very much for me to find a book about popes fascinating For a lot of people, this book will probably seem terribly dry it s nearly all institutional history, it dives head first into lots and lots of details, and at times it can seem frustratingly fixated on the papal curia There are, I don t know, sixty pages on papal finances I love stuff like that Institutional history has a reputation for stuffiness for a reason, but it s also incredibly important The papacy reached into absolutely every aspect of medieval life, particularly by the end of this period, and I think it s therefore hugely important to figure out how the papacy viewed itself in the broader context of the world in which it operated, and to learn the nuts and bolts of the curia in order to figure out how or to what degree it turned this self image into a reality This book does an excellent job of that Robinson s work is divided loosely into two sections in the first, he looks at the papacy as an institution Robinson provides a lovely amount of detail that s not easily summarized, but the general sense that one gets is one of gradual solidification and self definition Getting off to a quick start with the 11th century reformers, the papacy became increasingly keen to define itself as an entity especially in relation to secular powers and the episcopate and responded by developing a curia and a modus operandi that allowed it to be involved in both secular and spiritual affairs at the highest levels Robinson traces the rocky relationship with the Roman people that had the papacy enduring long periods of exile throughout the 12th century and the growing importance financial and political of the papal lands surrounding Rome Papal councils and legations also proved to be key tools of papal influence the latter became farnumerous and influential, and councils gradually emerged less as a judicial body centered on Rome andas as reforming tool that highlighted the power of the pope and curia Perhaps the most dependably influential function of the papacy, though, was judicial by the mid 12th century the papal court was flooded with legal appeals from all corners of Europe, spurring on the rising efficiency of the Roman curia and chancery But perhaps most important of all, for Robinson, were the cardinals The cardinals appear all over this book, to the extent that it s rather easy to imagine them as the real powers they elect the pope, they are his chief advisers, they tend to be the ones sent to broker deals with the secular powers And maybe most importantly, they re the ones who remain, running the curia, as individual popes come and go There s an aspect of institutional memory in the College that s fascinating, and I wish Robinson had been able to explore it a bit .The second half of the work explores the relationship of the papacy to the outside world It s necessarily limited relations with England and France are mentioned only in passing, Becket is mentioned only in relation to the conflict with Frederick Barbarossa But it s a good overview of the most pressing political issues of the 12th century for the papacy crusades, Normans, and the Empire Despite the necessary exclusions, Robinson does a nice job covering the period, and a particularly nice job of working in his discoveries from the work s first half Cardinals, especially in their role as legates, were crucial for Innocent II and Alexander III when they were attempting to assert themselves to the wider Christian world against the anti popes who were challenging them The importance of the papal lands becomes immediately clear as soon as a pope is exiled from Rome and thus divorced from the revenue of the lands associated with it The pendulum swing of alliances with the Normans and the Empire is traced back to the factions that repeatedly developed within the College of Cardinals The term papal monarchy pops up a lot in regards to this period and the one right after it It s an understandable one the papal curia frequently looks remarkably similar to the courts of contemporary secular monarchs But at the same time, Robinson s work does a good job of showing how the pope, even at the height of his influence, was working within a huge, complex, and multifaceted set of power structures

  3. Victoria says:

    Dry institutional history of the medieval papacy Argues that it was during this period that the papacy ceased to concern itself solely with its dimensions as the bishopric of Rome, and began actively to lay claim to its so called inheritance as the centre of Christendom The popes of this period began to articulate the forms of administration that would last into the modern era.

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