Ponga Boy

Ponga Boy❰Reading❯ ➿ Ponga Boy Author Phil Lebherz – Bluevapours.co.uk Ponga Boy is the story of a young Mexican boy’s journey from small town fisherman to college soccer megastar Pichu Castillian, alias Ponga Boy, grew up in an impoverished fishing village at the sout Ponga Boy is the story of a young Mexican boy’s journey from small town fisherman to college soccer megastar Pichu Castillian, alias Ponga Boy, grew up in an impoverished fishing village at the southern tip of the Baja Peninsula Pichu is the heart and soul of the dock, a local legend who works the bait fishing boats, or pongas, with his father, and amazes locals and tourists alike with his feats of athleticism One day he attracts the attention of two American collegiate soccer coaches After witnessing Pichu’s abilities, they offer him the opportunity of a lifetime—a tryout with the University of San Francisco soccer team and a full scholarship Pichu embarks on a journey that goes beyond soccer as he enters a world that challenges everything he’s ever known and leads him to confront who he is and what he really wants in life.

Phil Lebherz founded his own company, LISI Inc based in San Mateo, CA He has also created the nonprofit Foundation for Health Coverage Education to provide health care for people without insurance.

Audio CD  ¾ Ponga Boy PDF/EPUB ✓
    iOS for the iPad is the biggest iOS release ever and tourists alike with his feats of athleticism One day he attracts the attention of two American collegiate soccer coaches After witnessing Pichu’s abilities, they offer him the opportunity of a lifetime—a tryout with the University of San Francisco soccer team and a full scholarship Pichu embarks on a journey that goes beyond soccer as he enters a world that challenges everything he’s ever known and leads him to confront who he is and what he really wants in life."/>
  • Audio CD
  • 0 pages
  • Ponga Boy
  • Phil Lebherz
  • English
  • 19 October 2019
  • 9780615189574

10 thoughts on “Ponga Boy

  1. Sandra Stiles says:

    I have to say the reason I agreed to read and review this book is because I have many students who love soccer. Many of them are from Mexico, Brazil, and Haiti where the one thing they have in common is soccer. I teach reading and I also teach English to non-English speaking students. They are constantly trying to read my books on my shelves. The problem is that many of them can find nothing they relate to. I believe they will be able to relate to this book on many levels.

    Ponga Boy is the story of a young boy named Pichu. He lives in the small fishing village of Los Barriles. His father operates a ponga boat. Pichu loves fishing with his father. However, times are touch because the fish are not always there. He usually arrives early and can be found on the beach juggling a soccer ball or doing some other fantastic athletic feat. It is early one morning when two coaches from American happen upon him and see his ability. They offer him a dream. Come to America, go to college and play soccer. Pichu makes the tough decision to leave his parents and Angelina behind to reach his dream. However, he realizes that often times others do not have his dream in mind when they help make decisions for him. He has to decide for himself what he really wants before he completely loses who he is and was. He has to decide what his dream is and what he has to do to obtain it.

    I liked this book a lot because it really portrayed the world of sports the way it is. It showed there are consequences, good or bad, for each decision we make. It showed that sometimes to reach our dreams we have to make the toughest decisions of all. I can't wait to take this book to school and offer it up to my students. I know I will have so many who will be interested in it.

  2. Rebecca Graf says:

    A young boy grows up to be a young man with unbelievable soccer abilities. In his small Mexican town, a coach from an American college spots him and offers him a chance in a lifetime. Taking it, he sets out to find himself and discover the path soccer will lead him down.

    This is a book about coming of age, cultures, staying true to one’s self, honesty, humility, and the future. It starts with Pichu at ten years old and quickly progresses until he is an older teenager. You get a good glimpse into his life in Los Barriles, Mexico and the people who made up his community. From there, the reader is given a glimpse into American college culture, including the interactions with new people and foreigners.

    I felt that the writing style was more for middle grades, but the college scenes were more for older kids. There is nothing graphic or explicit, by any means, but sex comes up and is briefly discussed.

    The characters were very realistic. The egos of the soccer players, the flirting of the girls, the racial prejudices, and other cultural aspects were very realistic and right on target. I couldn’t help but feel angry at the way some of the characters were treated.

    What I loved the most about the story were the internal conflicts of Pichu. He is not perfect. He is extremely talented, but he still has a lot to learn and is willing to do so. Throughout the story is always himself and sticks close to his roots and believes. The story is one full of hope especially in young people as they step out into the world and become their own.

    If you are looking for a multi-cultural, coming of age book that is not too long and a relatively easy read, this is one you should really check out.


    Note: This book was provided by a colleague with no expectation of a positive review.

  3. John Brooke says:

    This story is about a growing young Mexicano boy from my village of Los Barriles in Baja California Sur. A boy with an inherent athletic ability and acrobatics that he employs playing football in the little concha in the center of town. He acquired his phenomenal sense of movement and balance through fishing with his father in an open panga on the Sea of Cortez. He is spotted by an American Soccer coach and awarded a scholarship at a California university to play on their college soccer team. Working with the team he soon comes of age, withstanding the false values and cultures, surrounding him in the United States. He stays true to the core of his own worth, with honesty and humility, despite the overwhelming culture of materialism surrounding him. His plight and internal dialog brought a lump to my throat and misty tears in my eyes as he resolves his self worth. The writers should be a acclaimed for their plain vanilla writing style that shows us through action packed soccer sequences what life is really about. A wonderful antidote to read, such a relief from corrupt moral values so prevalent among young North American culture in our times. It was a good clean healthy and refreshing read.


  4. Freda Mans-Labianca says:

    Young boys will really get a kick out of this story about Pichu, a boy from Mexico who is amazing at soccer.
    Parents will enjoy the book for the lessons it tries to teach kids reading it. It references bullying and perseverance, which are great and valuable things to teach kids.
    A really fun story too!

  5. Cathy says:

    If your reluctant male readers are captured by the World Cup event this summer, this may be the book to offer them this fall. It has all the elements: young soccer star from a small fishing village in Mexico, discovered by a talent scout, culture shock, Latino role models, hard choices, even a love interest.

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