Carl Hubbell: A Biography of the Screwball King

Carl Hubbell: A Biography of the Screwball King[PDF] ✪ Carl Hubbell: A Biography of the Screwball King Author Lowell L. Blaisdell – Bluevapours.co.uk This work is a biography of Carl Hubbell, a baseball legend who was active in the s for the New York Giants and an eighttime AllStar Hubbell was a lefthanded ace from Oklahoma who is still regarded as This work is a biography A Biography PDF Å of Carl Hubbell, a baseball legend who was active in the s for the New York Giants and an eighttime AllStar Hubbell was a lefthanded ace from Oklahoma who is still regarded as one of the greatest pitchers of all time and was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame inWith an emphasis on his pitching career, this biography covers both his Carl Hubbell: PDF or personal life and his development as a player.

Is a wellknown author, some A Biography PDF Å A Biography Epub of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Carl Hubbell: A Biography of the Screwball King book, this is one of the most wanted Lowell L Blaisdell author readers around the world.

Carl Hubbell: A Biography of the Screwball King Epub
  • Paperback
  • 212 pages
  • Carl Hubbell: A Biography of the Screwball King
  • Lowell L. Blaisdell
  • English
  • 08 October 2017
  • 9780786444656

12 thoughts on “Carl Hubbell: A Biography of the Screwball King

  1. Bruce says:

    When the Detroit Tigers gave Carl Hubbell a look see, player/manager Ty Cobb was not impressed and
    he spent some years in the minors optioned out by the Tigers. He was ready to quit when John McGraw signed him for the New York Giants and he made his debut with the Giants in 1928. He stayed as a player until 1943 and compile a 226-1 53 record.

    Hubbell was the second great practicioner of the screwball. The first was Christy Mathewson and
    when he pitched it was the fadeaway. The New York Giants had both of them.

    Hubbell was born in Carthage, Missouri in 1903 but was raised in Meeker, Oklahoma. Baseball was
    his way out of being a miner or a farmer. What the Tigers passed on was a great gain for the Giants.

    He was a modest man who let his pitching talk for him. It never talked louder than at the second
    All Star game in 1934 played at the Polo Grounds when Carl Hubbell struck out 5 future Hall of
    Famers for the American League, Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Jimmy Foxx, Al Simmons, and Joe Cronin.

    Hubbell's peak years were 1932 to 1938 when the Giants won 3 pennants at that time and one World
    Series. Hubbell performed well in all three classics 1933, 1936, and 1937 even if the Giants didn't
    in the last two losing those to the Yankees. 1936 and 1937 was when Hubbell set a major league
    record 24 consecutive wins over 2 seasons.

    His rival at the time was Dizzy Dean and Dean who didn't number modesty among his virtues always had a healthy respect for Hubbell. When they clashed in New York or St.Louis those were
    epic pitching duels.

    AFter his playing days were over Giant Owner Horace Stoneham made Hubbell the director the Giant farm system. He stayed there until Stoneham sold the club in the mid 70s. A lot of familiar
    names to Giant fans in New York and San Francisco were players developed in that farm system under his tutelage.

    Carl Hubbell died in 1988 when he suffered a stroke while driving and crashed a car. He had been
    a member of the Hall of Fame for decades and was a beloved figure for Giant fans in particular and
    baseball fans in general.

    Lowell L. Blaisdell has written a fine book on a baseball legend.

  2. Marcie Kremer says:

    If you love and respect the game of baseball and all its intricacies and nuances, you will thoroughly enjoy CARL HUBBELL: A BIOGRAPHY OF THE SCREWBALL KING, by Lowell Blaisdell. Reading Blaisdell’s self-deprecatory prologue could make a reader concerned that there really wasn’t enough information about Hubbell to write a biography, but, all fears are allayed once the book begins. Rather, it seems that Blaisdell’s training as a university history professor led him to be extremely circumspect and realistic about the amount of research he was able to do, especially considering that the media and the press weren’t as visible and as intrusive in Hubbell’s time as they are in the present. The achievements of Carl Hubbell, modest southpaw from Oklahoma, resonate today, even with the changes in the game, which Blaisdell has rigorously documented. To strike out five Hall of Famers in a row in an All-Star game and to have an ERA of 0.0 in a World Series game boggle the mind. Imagine striking out Babe Ruth on a called strike![return]Blaisdell does a thoroughly-documented and insightful job of describing the way the game was played in the 1930’s and 1940’s, such as how the MLB owners worked on making the baseball heavier with thicker cowhide and raised seams, resulting in fewer home runs and improvements in ERA’s, as well as making it easier for a screwball picture like Hubbell to have greater leverage. Additionally, Blaisdell sketches out how the Depression era changed baseball, as well, resulting in cutting down squads and giving little relief for pitchers. To save money on travel and to try and increase attendance, the emergence of double-headers and the “canceled wet-field games” extended winning streaks for teams, since they could play at home for longer times.[return]The backstory of the wins and losses that Hubbell was involved in is fascinating for its insights into the characters and their motivations and what factors were operating at the time to influence their decisions. Blaisdell supports his contention that Hubbell was a great pitcher by careful analysis and documentation. Blaisdell’s ability to look behind the statistics and re-create the game situations and the methodology that ran them is complemented by his lively writing style. Words and phrases such as “nemesis,” “heartbreaker,” “fierce struggle” add to the feeling of actually watching the game in person for the reader.[return]Carl Hubbell’s achievements are memorable, and Lowell Blaisdell does an excellent job of bolstering his thesis and making the story of this incredible pitching phenomenon memorable as well.

  3. Margo says:

    If you love and respect the game of baseball and all its intricacies and nuances, you will thoroughly enjoy CARL HUBBELL: A BIOGRAPHY OF THE SCREWBALL KING, by Lowell Blaisdell. Reading Blaisdell’s self-deprecatory prologue could make a reader concerned that there really wasn’t enough information about Hubbell to write a biography, but, all fears are allayed once the book begins. Rather, it seems that Blaisdell’s training as a university history professor led him to be extremely circumspect and realistic about the amount of research he was able to do, especially considering that the media and the press weren’t as visible and as intrusive in Hubbell’s time as they are in the present. The achievements of Carl Hubbell, modest southpaw from Oklahoma, resonate today, even with the changes in the game, which Blaisdell has rigorously documented. To strike out five Hall of Famers in a row in an All-Star game and to have an ERA of 0.0 in a World Series game boggle the mind. Imagine striking out Babe Ruth on a called strike!
    Blaisdell does a thoroughly-documented and insightful job of describing the way the game was played in the 1930’s and 1940’s, such as how the MLB owners worked on making the baseball heavier with thicker cowhide and raised seams, resulting in fewer home runs and improvements in ERA’s, as well as making it easier for a screwball picture like Hubbell to have greater leverage. Additionally, Blaisdell sketches out how the Depression era changed baseball, as well, resulting in cutting down squads and giving little relief for pitchers. To save money on travel and to try and increase attendance, the emergence of double-headers and the “canceled wet-field games” extended winning streaks for teams, since they could play at home for longer times.
    The backstory of the wins and losses that Hubbell was involved in is fascinating for its insights into the characters and their motivations and what factors were operating at the time to influence their decisions. Blaisdell supports his contention that Hubbell was a great pitcher by careful analysis and documentation. Blaisdell’s ability to look behind the statistics and re-create the game situations and the methodology that ran them is complemented by his lively writing style. Words and phrases such as “nemesis,” “heartbreaker,” “fierce struggle” add to the feeling of actually watching the game in person for the reader.
    Carl Hubbell’s achievements are memorable, and Lowell Blaisdell does an excellent job of bolstering his thesis and making the story of this incredible pitching phenomenon memorable as well.

  4. Robert Morrow says:

    A thoroughly researched biography of one of the great pitchers of all time. The author faced one large obstacle in his quest: the subject was a very private person who shared little of his private life with anyone. Mr. Blaisdell managed to avoid unnecessary speculation about missing information and instead crafted a narrative based on Hubbell's professional trajectory that made for a compelling story nonetheless.

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