The Myth of Sisyphus

The Myth of Sisyphus➾ [Download] ➾ The Myth of Sisyphus By Albert Camus ➳ – Bluevapours.co.uk Throughout history, some books have changed the world They have transformed the way we see ourselves and each other They have inspired debate, dissent, war and revolution They have enlightened, outrag Throughout history, some books have changed the world They have transformed the way we see ourselves and each other They have inspired debate, dissent, war and revolution They have enlightened, outraged, provoked and comforted They have enriched lives and destroyed them Now Penguin brings you the works of the great thinkers, pioneers, radicals and visionaries whose ideas shook civilization and helped make us who we are Inspired by the myth of a man condemned to ceaselessly push a rock up a mountain and watch it roll back to the valley below, The Myth of Sisyphus transformed The Myth Kindle - twentieth century philosophy with its impassioned argument for the value of life in a world without religious meaning.

Albert Camus was a representative of non metropolitan French literature His origin in Algeria and his experiences there in the thirties were dominating influences in his thought and work Of semi proletarian parents, early attached to intellectual circles of strongly revolutionary tendencies, with a deep interest in philosophy only chance prevented him from pursuing a university career in that field , he came to France at the age of twenty five The man and the times met Camus joined the resistance movement during the occupation and after the liberation was a columnist for the The Myth Kindle - newspaper Combat But his journalistic activities had been chiefly a response to the demands of the time in Camus retired from political journalism and, besides writing his fiction and essays, was very active in the theatre as producer and playwright eg Caligula, He also adapted plays by Calderon, Lope de Vega, Dino Buzzati, and Faulkner s Requiem for a Nun His love for the theatre may be traced back to his membership in L Equipe, an Algerian theatre group, whose collective creation R volte dans les Asturies was banned for political reasonsThe essay Le Mythe de Sisyphe The Myth of Sisyphus , , expounds Camus s notion of the absurd and of its acceptance with the total absence of hope, which has nothing to do with despair, a continual refusal, which must not be confused with renouncement and a conscious dissatisfaction Meursault, central character of L tranger The Stranger , , illustrates much of this essay man as the nauseated victim of the absurd orthodoxy of habit, later when the young killer faces execution tempted by despair, hope, and salvation Dr Rieux of La Peste The Plague , , who tirelessly attends the plague stricken citizens of Oran, enacts the revolt against a world of the absurd and of injustice, and confirms Camus s words We refuse to despair of mankind Without having the unreasonable ambition to save men, we still want to serve them Other well known works of Camus are La Chute The Fall , , and L Exil et le royaume Exile and the Kingdom , His austere search for moral order found its aesthetic correlative in the classicism of his art He was a stylist of great purity and intense concentration and rationality.

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  • 192 pages
  • The Myth of Sisyphus
  • Albert Camus
  • English
  • 04 March 2018
  • 0141182008

10 thoughts on “The Myth of Sisyphus

  1. Erik Graff says:

    By the end of high school I was a very unhappy person and had been so since our family moved from unincorporated Kane County to Park Ridge, Illinois when I was ten At the outset the unhappiness was basically consequent upon leaving a rural setting, small school and friendly, integrated working class neighborhood for a reactionary suburb, large school and unfriendly upper middle class populace whose children were, by and large, just as thoughtlessly racist and conservative as their parents were By the end of high school I was a very unhappy person and had been so since our family moved from unincorporated Kane County to Park Ridge, Illinois when I was ten At the outset the unhappiness was basically consequent upon leaving a rural setting, small school and friendly, integrated working class neighborhood for a reactionary suburb, large school and unfriendly upper middle class populace whose children were, by and large, just as thoughtlessly racist and conservative as their parents were By fifteen, however, the quality of the unhappiness had begun to change as I had made, really made, some friends in the persons of Richard Hyde and Hank Kupjack By the end of high school, thanks to them and to the rise of the sixties counterculture, I actually had many friends, some of them from the political left, some identified with the avant garde world, some just plain disgruntled teen potheads But by then unhappiness had become character and had been elevated from an emotional to a philosophical state of being.On the one hand, it had a lot to do with not having had a girlfriend since Lisa in the first grade On the other hand, and this wasprominently to mind, it had to do with the reasons, the serious reasons, for not having one They were that I was unusually slow in physical development and unusually short in stature In my mind, I was uncontestably unattractive If any girl would like me it would be because of personality and intelligence,I had no insecurity about intelligence as a teen, but quite a bit about personality Feminism didn t become an issue until college, but I was ashamed about thinking of women sexually when it seemed clear they would be offended or disgusted were they to know of it I developed the practice of not looking at females unless speaking with them I walked with my head down, eyes to the ground, in order to avoid such guilt ridden gazes While other guys played around with the girls in our circle, I maintained a generally grave persona, holding serious conversations or reading while they flirted A feeling of superiority was confusedly mixed with strong feelings of inferiority to these other,comfortable, persons While it was easy to dismiss most of the straight kids at school as mindless, this was not possible with many persons in our circle, particularly some of the older ones whom I admired for their learning and critical intellects.The other, philosophically deeper, dimension of this unease was that I myself was so critically intelligent that I had no ground upon which to stand I had strong moral feelings but I was unable to convince myself that they werethan personal tastes My early public school education had emphasized the sciences While I could understand human values as having some meaning in terms of biology and evolutionary theory, I could not fit myself positively into that picture I certainly wasn t biologically fit Thoughts of suicide were frequent.Thus I was drawn, upon being exposed to them, to the existentialists, particularly Camus They alone seemed to be trying to speak openly about the actual human conditionI recall reading The Myth of Sisyphus while seated in our family s red Opel Cadet station wagon across from City Hall, at the curb of Hodge s Park on a beautiful spring day Our friends were all about this area between Bob Rowe s Evening Pipe Shop, Park Ridge s Community Church and the Cogswell Dance Studio our indoors hangouts , but I was avoiding their frivolity, engaged in serious study, while, obviously, inviting an invitation to join in which, in my moral confusion, I might well have declined.Just as I was concluding this essay of the collection, the part about Sisyphus being happy with his absurd work, Lisa Cox walked in front of the car, headed west towards the church Now, Lisa was just another pretty girl in our group, not the particular object of any attention from me Indeed, she was too young, being two years behind in school But, not being an intimate friend, she was one of those girls I would tend to guiltily objectify as sexual.Here, however, it happened differently She was beautiful, simply beautiful Her long, tightly waved brown hair and matching corduroy pants, all bathed in sunlight dappled by the new leaves of the elms filling the park, were lovely I didn t feel guilty for thinking this I noticed the absence of guilt feelings It seemed quite paradoxical, just as Camus comment about Sisyphus had appeared, but true.I d call this an ecstatic experience It didn t lastthan a few minutes at most, though the memory of it, and experiences like it, remains clear and cherished

  2. BlackOxford says:

    Assisted LivingIt was that Jewish heretic Paul of Tarsus who gave us the idea that we are not in charge of our lives but are merely responsible for them to God who owns us It was the English philosopher John Locke, a heretic to Pauline Calvinism, who casually pointed out that in fact our lives are the only thing we do have complete charge over, the only thing every one of us owns and can dispose of And it was Albert Camus, a heretic to any and all sources of power, who took Locke entirely seri Assisted LivingIt was that Jewish heretic Paul of Tarsus who gave us the idea that we are not in charge of our lives but are merely responsible for them to God who owns us It was the English philosopher John Locke, a heretic to Pauline Calvinism, who casually pointed out that in fact our lives are the only thing we do have complete charge over, the only thing every one of us owns and can dispose of And it was Albert Camus, a heretic to any and all sources of power, who took Locke entirely seriously by pointing out that how we dispose of life is the central issue of not just life but philosophy The result is Sisyphus.The followers of previous heretics evangelical Christians, PC and wet liberals don t like Camus But they can t fault his conclusions They may not approve of his marketing of suicide as a universally available option for disposing of life, but these are the same people who don t approve of gay sex or the discussion of religion in public So hardly credible Clearly Camus s analysis includes both Paul s and Locke s as special cases, and is therefore superior to them both Camus doesn t advocate suicide he does advocate its importance to life and thought Without it we are dead, as it were, all but physically Habit and chance rule Life is not inherently absurd but becomes so when death, specifically self inflicted death, is not on the table Evasions illusion, after life, hope, consuming, power, sex, reputation become the norm that is socially enforced Eliminating evasions is what Camus is trying to do.There is rarely a page in Sisyphus without a phrase to savour and as memorable as anything in Montaigne Just for openers p2 I have never seen anyone die for the ontological argument p3 Beginning to think is beginning to be undermined p4 A world that can be explained even with bad reasons is a familiar world So even if the logic gets you down, you have some rather sustaining prose to exchange with the spouse or functional equivalent over breakfast

  3. Samra Yusuf says:

    No matter in what farthest corner of the world you live, which color is of your skin, what kind of habits you ve grown over the time for you to be known as a busy person, what are the erogenous fantasies your mind weave in the moments of quiet to make you tremble with pleasure, which, from many doctrines you chose to scale the things as right and wrong which one from countless delusions you ve opted as religion, or you weren t the one to opt it, you inherited it like other concrete property, No matter in what farthest corner of the world you live, which color is of your skin, what kind of habits you ve grown over the time for you to be known as a busy person, what are the erogenous fantasies your mind weave in the moments of quiet to make you tremble with pleasure, which, from many doctrines you chose to scale the things as right and wrong which one from countless delusions you ve opted as religion, or you weren t the one to opt it, you inherited it like other concrete property, to which fairy god you sold your reason in exchange of a fabricated assurance of hereafter and a hoax of a succor for your inner void, it is absurd to find meaning in the meaninglessness of life, to keep asking questions for which there s no answer, because life doesn t offer any, there s nothing like truth in this senseless world Camus puts it as That universal reason, practical or ethical, that determinism, those categories that explain everything are enough to make a decent man laugh MS, 21.So, one is inclined to ask, is life worth living If not, why don t we cease to exist, as there s no meaning to keep going on a path which leads to nowhere but right at the point we started our journey from, if there s no hope of life after this one, why to live this one to begin with, and this leads us to existential anxiety , for Camus, it is only when one abandons hope, one can live to one s fullest, Abandon hope all ye who enter here and live because we are our fate, and our frustration is our very life we can never escape it, and consequently, the truly one philosophical question suicide must be out of question, simply not an option, because if life s not worth living for someone who strives to have a meaning, so is death, there s no point in committing suicide, because it entails that one is quitting to something he couldn t grasp, let we be indifferent to what that simply doesn t make a difference.So did our absurd hero, Sisyphus, who was punished by gods for airing secrecy, he was to lift a boulder heaviest than skies on his shoulders, and climb the mountain, by reaching up, the boulder will roll down with Godspeed and Sisyphus had to watch it all the while, lift the boulder, ascent the mountain, watch it rolling down, for eternity But the pleasure lies in knowing, Sisyphus knew the meaninglessness of his act, the absurdity of doing it again and again, with no hope in way, withpassion every time he goes down to lift the boulder, with new intensity, never resigning himself to despair, because despair roots out from presence of hope, if there s no hope otherwise, certainly never is there despair And for Camus, Sisyphus triumph is his act of this absurdity His scorn of the gods, his hatred of death, and his passion for life won him that unspeakable penalty in which the whole being is exerted toward accomplishing nothing MS, 120

  4. Fergus says:

    When I picked up this beloved old book this morning, after awakening from a painfully fitful sleep, the words in it seemed to be my own They are all that clearly familiar to me, after so many years away from them.So it goes with life As we approach the years of our old age, the routine of our life falls into place without our even trying if we have been paying attention to it.That s because the way we now live our life is something obvious, like the habits of a dear old friend There are few When I picked up this beloved old book this morning, after awakening from a painfully fitful sleep, the words in it seemed to be my own They are all that clearly familiar to me, after so many years away from them.So it goes with life As we approach the years of our old age, the routine of our life falls into place without our even trying if we have been paying attention to it.That s because the way we now live our life is something obvious, like the habits of a dear old friend There are few surprises Things are lucid.We have become, as Auden says so well, like the etched strata of a limestone cliff for we have become our Faults, friendly qualities with which we are now as familiar as with the back of our hand.So it is with that apparition which Camus here calls the worm in our heart For that is the very heart of the evil in our world.How we choose the inevitable flight from that too lucid apparition will decide our destiny After that, our habits become something we can only modify And not break.When I was a very young teen in the throes of coming of age, I in my fear chose the framework of a Christian mindset with which to judge my urges, and I m glad I did It has served me very ably Unfortunately, my young mind was too predisposed to dreaming, to interpret this mindset as anything other than mystical and dream like.As G rard de Nerval sang so well J ai deux fois vainqueur travers l Acheron Modulant tour tour sur la lyre d Orphee Les soupirs de la Sainte et les cris de la f e.In fact, it is the polar opposite of the affective, this conscious dual awareness for it s intensely practical.It is the very beginning of an annulment of affectivity, eventually resulting in anatural and real love.I can verify that now, in light of the habitual ease of my generally virtuous habits, however jarringly at odds with reality they may seem to my contemporaries.All well and good so far But there s a problem here.For though the Framework of my thoughts was useful and viable, my habitual responses to that worm in the heart were not.I always chose A Dark Flight from that Worm Camus says we all do when I could have chosen a Lucid Fight to be Conscious of it.That may seem pre Freudian but bear me out.For if we answer the Lucidity of the Worm with the Lucidity of Conscious Awareness, we will still, like the rest of the human race, veer in our unguarded moments towards weakness and disaster.But here s the thing by lucid awareness of the worm when we are convinced that intelligent struggle will lead us to greater inner enlightenment we can make the whole scenario transparent to our own habitual subconscious thinking.As Camus does by making the monsters of nothingness rationally visible.And what happens when the Worm is transparent He becomesor less harmless.And our life gains a New Quality Peace.THAT is what happens when, as Eliot says, the Kingfisher s wing answers Light to Light, and is Silent Did you get that The King shines the Light of Heaven on our lucid struggle with a Very Lucid Enemy.And His Silence thereafter is our PeaceAnd a Sign of His Blessing For, as the psalmist says, Ce go t du n ant est seulement le go t du mensonge And That s how our old age can become transparent With a sense of humdrum tranquility.And a return to daytime normalcy after the midnight nightmares of the worm

  5. Zanna says:

    A good friend introduced me to Nietzsche in my early teens, and Nietzsche and I have had a turbulent relationship ever since One of the first adult books I read was Kafka s The Trial and Nietzsche was there too, inviting me to step off the city on poles into the bottomless swamp Oh baby hold my handwe re gonna walk on water Nietzsche said there are no facts, no truth After he said this, some philosophers stopped writing like Kant and wrote like poets Camus says here that there is no truth A good friend introduced me to Nietzsche in my early teens, and Nietzsche and I have had a turbulent relationship ever since One of the first adult books I read was Kafka s The Trial and Nietzsche was there too, inviting me to step off the city on poles into the bottomless swamp Oh baby hold my handwe re gonna walk on water Nietzsche said there are no facts, no truth After he said this, some philosophers stopped writing like Kant and wrote like poets Camus says here that there is no truth, merely truths From the evening breeze to this hand on my shoulder Consciousness creates a shimmer of truths.If there is no god and we are all condemned to death and I am conscious then my life is absurd Existentialists arrived here and made their leaps of faith to gods Karl Popper made the leap of faith to reason reason is Popper s god There is no a priori argument for reason , but Camus does not want to leap, he asks if we can live with what we have, this absurd life, and not kill ourselves Nietzsche said we make art in order not to commit suicide Camus tells us that Dostoyevsky found his leap here if we cannot bear to live without belief in an immortal soul, then the immortal soul must be Camus will not leap and he will not choose suicide he decides we can live with what we have if we remain lucid and conscious and don t succumb to illusion After Camus, some artists created in order to provoke and maintain the absurd consciousness This is the effect Beckett gets, I think, in Waiting for Godot The sleeplessness, the watchfulness, the silliness of Camus absurdity.I have myself been tempted by the leap, to reason or the immortal soul But in the main I have lived after Nietzsche, without much anguish I do not find it so hard to imagine Sisyphus happy , to watch with Camus as he walks down to the valley of hell after his rock to start over, stronger than the rock then, striding unencumbered I ve been busy and the birds have sung and food has tasted good and love has touched me These White men who had so little to do that they were overwhelmed by grief for lost illusions might have felt better after baking a loaf or sweeping out the house In all seriousness Camus gives three sketches of absurd men Don Juan and the conqueror I have no use for, as with much of this book, I discard them as too mired in patriarchy to use without starting again But the sketch of the actor sings out to me What matters, said Nietzsche, is not eternal life but eternal vivacity All drama is, in fact, in this choice Not because we should live as though in the limelight, or even because there is no rehearsal no eternal return but because in drama the shimmer of truth is shared Camus does not seem to have thought of this his absurd man is oh tragically alone again I advise him bath the baby, wash the linen But in the theatre we are not alone, we are fish in the water of each other s truths, we can live them in these mirrors As another philosopher said, there has never been one person

  6. Ian "Marvin" Graye says:

    The One True Philosophical ProblemThe Myth of Sisyphuspurports to be about theone truly philosophical problem of suicide.Perhaps, it s a little sensationalist to define the problem in these terms, at least in the 21st century Even Camus himself immediately restated the problem asjudging whether life is or is not worth living.Maybe another way is to ask whether, if life is not worth living, does it follow that we should cease to live, e.g., by committing suicide It s interesting how The One True Philosophical ProblemThe Myth of Sisyphuspurports to be about theone truly philosophical problem of suicide.Perhaps, it s a little sensationalist to define the problem in these terms, at least in the 21st century Even Camus himself immediately restated the problem asjudging whether life is or is not worth living.Maybe another way is to ask whether, if life is not worth living, does it follow that we should cease to live, e.g., by committing suicide It s interesting how we commit four things errors, crimes, sins, suicide Camus tends to assume that, in the absence of God, there is no meaning of life, at least no superimposed, objective meaning of life.Thus, for him, the resulting absurdity is the starting point, not the result of a deductive process.If life is truly meaningless, the question is how to respond Do we revert to the meaning of life posited by religion and a supernatural being an irrational response Do we commit suicide in order to escape the absence of meaning the result of despair Or do we embrace the absurdity implicit in an absence of meaning without accepting it revolt Franz von Stuck s Sisyphus 1920 The ConfrontationFor Camus, we long for meaning Yet, we don t readily find it Partly because it isn t there The absurd is born ofthe confrontation between the human need and the unreasonable silence of the world. 29 The absurd is a divorceIt lies in neither of the elements compared it is born of their confrontation And what is the confrontation between In effect,the Absurd is not in mannor in the world, but in their presence together30 Absurdity describes a relationship between the two.Not just is the Absurd a confrontation, but it is also anunceasing struggle , which struggleimplies a total absence of hope, a continual rejection and a conscious dissatisfactionA man devoid of hope and conscious of being so has ceased to belong to the future31 Arguably, a man with no hope has no reason to continue living into the future Without hope, what awaits us is inevitable death which awaits us anyway, with or without hope.The EscapeCamus considers that all existentialist attempts to deal with the Absurdsuggest escapethey deify what crushes them and find reason to hope in what impoverishes them He maintains thatnothing logically prepares this reason I can call it a leapParadoxically, it shares something with a religious leap of faithwe turn towards God only to obtain the impossible As for the possible, men suffice33 Nevertheless, the leap is an escape By it, we seek to elude the Absurd.EnduranceIn contrast, Camus argues thatliving is keeping the absurd alive47 We must keep it alive so that we can confront and endure it To do so, we must revolt against itIt is a constant confrontation between man and his own obscurity It is an insistence upon an impossible transparencymetaphysical revolt extends awareness to the whole of experienceRevolt gives life its value Spread out over the whole of a life, it restores its majesty to that life To a man devoid of blinkers, there is no finer sight than that of the intelligence at grips with a reality that transcends it47 Camus solution therefore is consciousness and revolt 48 Suicide is an illusory solutionIt is essential to die unreconciled to the Absurd and not of one s own free will49 The RevoltAccording to Camus, man must never surrender or give in We must livewithout appealto some greater natural or supernatural authority Only then are we truly free and responsible 52 Camus sees the future, inevitably, as an invitation to death However, he converts the revolt, the refusal to commit suicide, into a rule of life.The Absurd therefore gives us three qualities our revolt, our freedom, and our passion for life over death 55 Camus distinguishes betweenrenunciationandrevolt.Renunciationis an irrational denial of the absurd, e.g., like religion Camus writesconsciousness and revolt, these rejections are the contrary of renunciationRejection doesn t deny the existence of the absurd, whereas renunciation does The Point is to Live These arguments define a metaphysical process, a way of thinking However, Camus concludes,The point is to live56 We must live without appeal, but informed of our limits 57 It isessential to elude nothing There is thus a metaphysical honour in enduring the world s absurdity Conquest or play acting, multiple loves, absurd revolt are tributes that man pays to his dignity in a campaign in which he is defeated in advance77 There is honour in battle, honour in confrontation, honour in revolt.Metaphysical Art and LiteratureCamus finds sustenance in artThe great novelists are philosophical novelistswhat distinguishes modern sensibility from classical sensibility is that the latter thrives on moral problems and the former on metaphysical problems85 For me, the focus on the metaphysical points to a bridge between modernism and post modernism Both are separate from the realist focus on morality, on problems of good and evil Art is fundamental to our pursuit of freedom in the short time we have on earth In art, we findnot the divine fable that amuses and blinds, but the terrestrial face, gesture, and drama in which are summed up a difficult wisdom and an ephemeral passion95 Art captures the ephemeral flame that burns passionate and bright for the duration of our short sojourn The Myth of SisyphusIt s here that Camus introduces the myth of Sisyphus The burden of Sisyphus is his fate Perhaps it is a futile and hopeless labour However,all Sisyphus silent joy is contained therein His fate belongs to him His rock is his thing98 In the same way,the absurd man, when he contemplates his torment, silences all the idols,the illusions that encourage him to elude AbsurdityThere is no sun without shadow, and it is essential to know the night He who recognises this will be the master of his daysThe struggle itself towards the heights is enough to fill a man s heart One must imagine Sisyphus happy99 So too, we must imagine Sisyphus happy, if we are to be happy, because ultimately our burden is the same.SOUNDTRAK Soul II Soul Get a Life II Soul Keep On Movin

  7. Steven Godin says:

    This was a fascinating insight into a thought provoking question, Albert Camus suggests that suicide amounts to a confession that life is not worth living He links this confession to what he calls the feeling of absurdity , that on the whole, we go through life with meaning and purpose, with a sense that we do things for good and profound reasons Occasionally, however for some at least, we might come to see our daily lives dictated primarily by the forces of habit, thus bringing into question This was a fascinating insight into a thought provoking question, Albert Camus suggests that suicide amounts to a confession that life is not worth living He links this confession to what he calls the feeling of absurdity , that on the whole, we go through life with meaning and purpose, with a sense that we do things for good and profound reasons Occasionally, however for some at least, we might come to see our daily lives dictated primarily by the forces of habit, thus bringing into question the following, if one feels that the embodiment of freedom is lost to a drone like existence, all of our actions and reasons for them to a degree become pointless, with a feeling of absurdity linked to meaningless, meaningless to death by ones own hand Camus in basic terms simply implies that we start to live before the habit of thinking on a deep level takes hold, thus avoiding the consequences of the meaningless nature of life, through what Camus calls an act of eluding , we choose not to think about the absurd because our nature is built on that of hopes and dreams for a meaningful life rather than face the consequences of staring into the void.One the main attributes used throughout his fiction, that of exile is also included heavily as a comparative for this essay No one else but Camus could have wrote this work, as soon as you enter his world, the world around you becomes less apparent

  8. P.E. says:

    Le Penseur, de Bernard et Clotilde Barto near La M diath que Jacques Demy, Nantes Right after Promise at Dawn La Promesse de l Aube , I wrap up The myth of Sisyphus and come out eventually disheartened by the mighty silence ruling over the studio in Lorient In spare words, this is a study on the absurd The onset is is life worth living The subject is tailored to make you react to it and decide where you stand.On the whole, I don t align with Camus I am astounded by the sternness Le Penseur, de Bernard et Clotilde Barto near La M diath que Jacques Demy, Nantes Right after Promise at Dawn La Promesse de l Aube , I wrap up The myth of Sisyphus and come out eventually disheartened by the mighty silence ruling over the studio in Lorient In spare words, this is a study on the absurd The onset is is life worth living The subject is tailored to make you react to it and decide where you stand.On the whole, I don t align with Camus I am astounded by the sternness of his observations Indeed, they are accountable to the aim Camus sets but they entirely negate joy and ivresse, together with whatever personal purpuse and illusion they may bear to you.Camus writes What is absurd is the meeting of the irrational with the craving and the call for clarity which resonates in the innermost depths of man. Ce qui est absurde, c est la confrontation de cet irrationnel et de ce d sir perdu de clart dont l appel r sonne au plus profond de l homme Le mythe de Sisyphe, Folio essais 1942 , p.36 If I were a tree among trees, a cat among animals, life would have purpose, or to put it in other words, this problem wouldn t have, because I would be part of the world I would be the world against which I set myself with my whole conscience and by my requiring it to be kindred Si j tais arbre parmi les arbres, chat parmi les animaux, cette vie aurait un sens, ou plut t ce probl me n en aurait point car je ferais partie de ce monde Je serais ce monde auquel je m oppose maintenant par toute ma conscience et par toute mon exigence de familiaritLe mythe de Sisyphe, Folio essais 1942 , p.76Although, where did Camus s absurd man come from Like a tree among trees, he comes from a state of implied oneness with the world, he once lived in oneness This state is by no means gratuitous Once, there was a link, a kinship with the world, now reigns silence This is, I guess, what could lead to such dereliction.Camus states Absurd is born of the meeting of the human desire with the insensate silence of the world. L absurde na t de la confrontation de l appel humain avec le silence d raisonnable du monde Le mythe de Sisyphe, Folio essais 1942 , p.46It sounds short sighted though the world may well be insensate, unreasonable, irrationnal, but this delirium is by no means silent.Let us agree the world has no meaning whatsoever by itself But to hold to you can t construe a personal, makeshift, limited purpose out of the world as you meet people in this delirium, is untrue And out of the meager purpose that could weld out of this insensate world, I know friendship is the most tangible and vital happening.So like Chestov and Husserl, who did consent to considerable crookedness to ram in their demonstrations and force their conclusions, as to where I stand, I think Camus s scepticism have him discard some elementary truths to uphold the passion of the absurd to the end Je boucle le mythe de Sisyphe apr s La promesse de l aube et j en ressors accabl par le silence souverain d un studio Lorient.Je ne rejoins pas enti rement Camus dans des observations qui me surprennent par leur aridit d ensemble, explicables par le but qu il se donne mais qui nient la joie avec ce qu elle comporte d ivresse, de sens propre chacun, d illusion si on veut Camus crit Ce qui est absurde, c est la confrontation de cet irrationnel et de ce d sir perdu de clart dont l appel r sonne au plus profond de l homme Le mythe de Sisyphe, Folio essais 1942 , p.36 Si j tais arbre parmi les arbres, chat parmi les animaux, cette vie aurait un sens, ou plut t ce probl me n en aurait point car je ferais partie de ce monde Je serais ce monde auquel je m oppose maintenant par toute ma conscience et par toute mon exigence de familiarit Le mythe de Sisyphe, Folio essais 1942 , p.76Et pourtant, comme l arbre parmi les arbres, l homme absurde de Camus tait parti d un tat d unit tacite avec le monde Ce premier tat n a rien de n gligeable L o il y avait d abord un lien, le silence ensuite Voil ce qui para t conduire la perte de sens Camus soutient L absurde na t de la confrontation de l appel humain avec le silence d raisonnable du monde Le mythe de Sisyphe, Folio essais 1942 , p.46Il n y a qu un malheur si le monde est d raisonnable, ce d lire fait de chim res, d ivresses et de rencontres n a rien de silencieux.Le monde n a aucun sens intelligible par lui m me, mettons De l soutenir qu on ne peut pas construire un sens provisoire au monde au cours des rencontres, il y a loin, et du sens qui filtre de ce monde d raisonnable, l amiti me para t la manifestation la plus tangible et la plus vivante.Comme Chestov et Husserl qui consentent des entorses consid rables pour aboutir de force leurs conclusions, je crois aujourd hui que le scepticisme de Camus le pousse sacrifier quelques v rit s l mentaires pour soutenir la passion de l absurde jusqu son terme logique

  9. Magdalen says:

    Should I kill myself or have a cup of coffee the book in one sentenceor less Definitely one of those books youmustreread..

  10. Rowland Pasaribu says:

    Albert Camus 1913 1960 is not a philosopher so much as a novelist with a strong philosophical bent He is most famous for his novels of ideas, such as The Stranger and The Plague, both of which are set in the arid landscape of his native Algeria.Camus studied philosophy at the University of Algiers, which brought him into contact with two of the major branches of twentieth century philosophy existentialism and phenomenology Existentialism arises from an awareness that there is no pre ordaine Albert Camus 1913 1960 is not a philosopher so much as a novelist with a strong philosophical bent He is most famous for his novels of ideas, such as The Stranger and The Plague, both of which are set in the arid landscape of his native Algeria.Camus studied philosophy at the University of Algiers, which brought him into contact with two of the major branches of twentieth century philosophy existentialism and phenomenology Existentialism arises from an awareness that there is no pre ordained meaning or order in the universe and that we must take responsibility for determining the meaning and order we are to give to our lives Camus is particularly interested in religious existentialists, such as Kierkegaard though such a label is not entirely fair to Kierkegard , who conclude that there is no meaning to be found in human experience, and that this necessitates a leap of faith that places an irrational and blind faith in God.Phenomenology, as advocated by Edmund Husserl, confines itself to observing and describing our own consciousness without drawing any conclusions regarding causes or connections Like existentialism, phenomenology influenced Camus by its effort to construct a worldview that does not assume that there is some sort of rational structure to the universe that the human mind can apprehend.This idea that the universe has a rational structure that the mind can apprehend characterizes an older trend in European philosophy called rationalism Rationalism traces its roots to Rene Descartes and to the birth of modern philosophy Most of twentieth century European philosophy has been a direct reaction to this older tradition, a reactionary attempt to explore the possibility that the universe has no rational structure for the mind to apprehend.Camus wrote The Myth of Sisyphus around the same time he wrote his first novel, The Stranger, at the beginning of World War II Camus was working for the French Resistance in Paris at this time, far from his native Algeria While it is never wise to reduce ideas to their autobiographical background, the circumstances in which this essay was written can help us understand its tone The metaphor of exile that Camus uses to describe the human predicament and the sense that life is a meaningless and futile struggle both make a great deal of sense coming from a man, far from his home, who was struggling against a seemingly omnipotent and senselessly brutal regime.The central concern of The Myth of Sisyphus is what Camus calls the absurd Camus claims that there is a fundamental conflict between what we want from the universe whether it be meaning, order, or reasons and what we find in the universe formless chaos We will never find in life itself the meaning that we want to find Either we will discover that meaning through a leap of faith, by placing our hopes in a God beyond this world, or we will conclude that life is meaningless Camus opens the essay by asking if this latter conclusion that life is meaningless necessarily leads one to commit suicide If life has no meaning, does that mean life is not worth living If that were the case, we would have no option but to make a leap of faith or to commit suicide, says Camus Camus is interested in pursuing a third possibility that we can accept and live in a world devoid of meaning or purpose.As his starting point, Camus takes up the question of whether, on the one hand, we are free agents with souls and values, or if, on the other hand, we are just matter that moves about with mindless regularity Reconciling these two equally undeniable perspectives is one of the great projects of religion and philosophy.One of the most obvious and on reflection, one of the most puzzling facts about human existence is that we have values Having values isthan simply having desires if I desire something, I quite simply want it and will try to get it My values go beyond my desires in that by valuing something, I do not simply desire it, but I also somehow judge that that something ought to be desired In saying that something ought to be desired, I am assuming that the world ought to be a certain way Further, I only feel the world ought to be a certain way if it is not entirely that way already if there was no such thing as murder it would not make sense for me to say that people should not commit murder Thus, having values implies that we feel the world ought to be different from the way it is.Our capacity to see the world both as it is and as it ought to be allows us to look at ourselves in two very different lights Most frequently, we see others and ourselves as willing, free agents, people who can deliberate and make choices, who can decide what s best and pursue certain ends Because we have values it only makes sense that we should also see ourselves as capable of embodying those values There would be no point in valuing certain qualities if we were incapable of acting to realize those qualities.While we generally take this outlook, there is also the outlook of the scientist, of trying to see the world quite simply as it is Scientifically speaking, this is a world divested of values, made up simply of matter and energy, where mindless particles interact in predetermined ways There is no reason to think that humans are any exception to the laws of science Just as we observe the behavior of ants milling about, mindlessly following some sort of mechanical routine, we can imagine alien scientists might also observe us milling about, and conclude that our behavior is equally predictable and routine oriented.The feeling of absurdity is effectively the feeling we get when we come to see ourselves in the second of these two alternative perspectives This is a strictly objective worldview that looks at things quite simply as they are Values are irrelevant to this worldview, and without values there seems to be no meaning and no purpose to anything we do Without values, life has no meaning and there is nothing to motivate us to do one thing rather than another.Though we may never have tried to rationalize this feeling philosophically, the feeling of absurdity is one that we have all experienced at some point in our life In moments of depression or uncertainty, we might shrug and ask, what s the point of doing anything This question is essentially a recognition of absurdity, a recognition that, from at least one perspective, there is no point in doing anything.Camus often refers metaphorically to the feeling of absurdity as a place of exile Once we have acknowledged the validity of the perspective of a world without values, of a life without meaning, there is no turning back We cannot simply forget or ignore this perspective The absurd is a shadow cast over everything we do And even if we choose to live as if life has a meaning, as if there are reasons for doing things, the absurd will linger in the back of our minds as a nagging doubt that perhaps there is no point.It is generally supposed that this place of exile the absurd is uninhabitable If there is no reason for doing anything, how can we ever do anything The two main ways of escaping the feeling of absurdity are suicide and hope Suicide concludes that if life is meaningless then it is not worth living Hope denies that life is meaningless by means of blind faith.Camus is interested in finding a third alternative Can we acknowledge that life is meaningless without committing suicide Do we have to at least hope that life has a meaning in order to live Can we have values if we acknowledge that values are meaningless Essentially, Camus is asking if the second of the two worldviews sketched above is livable.Camus is not a philosopher and he is not interested in engaging the aforementioned thinkers in an intellectual debate As in the previous chapter, where he rejected rationalism, Camus is not trying to refute these thinkers He does not give us arguments as to why their thinking is askew, but simply gives us reasons as to why he finds their thinking unsatisfying.Camus reduces the problem that interests him to two basic facts first, that man expects and hopes to find some sort of meaning in the world, and second, that whatever meaning the world may have is concealed from man It is important to note that Camus does not deny that God exists or that there is some inherent meaning or purpose behind everything He simply claims that he has no way of knowing whether or not there is a God or meaning or purpose His aim in The Myth of Sisyphus is to determine whether or not it is possible to live simply with what he knows That is, can he live with those two basic facts, or does he need either to hope for somethinga God or meaning or purpose or to commit suicide The absurd is the relationship that links these two basic facts It is absurd that I should expect the universe to have a meaning when the universe itself is so resolutely silent Because the absurd is the relationship that links the only two basic facts we can know for certain, Camus asserts that the absurd is our fundamental relationship with the world The absurd is a fundamental truth and Camus takes it as his duty to follow out its logic.The absurd is also essentially a conflict We demand meaning but the universe gives us none The dissatisfaction we feel with our lot in life is fundamental to the absurd, and any attempt to resolve this dissatisfaction is an attempt to escape from absurdity.Camus s complaint against the four thinkers discussed in this chapter is that, each in his own way attempts to escape from absurdity To do this, each thinker must reject one of the two basic facts that Camus has taken as his starting point Jaspers, Chestov, and Kierkegaard reject the need for reason and purpose in the world They embrace the idea that the world is irrational, and find God in this idea Husserl rejects the idea that we cannot find meaning in the world, claiming to find essences behind its mute phenomena.Camus is not a philosopher, and he is not accusing these thinkers of reasoning wrongly He is simply accusing them of not finding content in what they can know All four go beyond the basic, undeniable facts of experience to assert that there is something , something transcendent, something that resolves the dissatisfaction caused by their confrontation with the absurd They are not mistaken in doing so, but they are avoiding the question that seems to Camus to be fundamental do weneed to assert that there is somethingin order to live Camus s problem is a hypothetical one if there is nothingthan rational humans in an irrational universe, can we live with the absurdity of that situation The route Camus takes here is committed to shunning philosophy He purports to be interested only in whether a certain proposition is livable, not whether it is true If he were to try to assert his own metaphysical position, if he were to try to claim that such and such is the case, he would then be burdened with the responsibility of proving the superiority of his metaphysical position over those of other philosophers.All this is relevant because Camus comes dangerously close to metaphysics when he asserts that the absurd is our fundamental relationship with the world and that our need for reasons and the silence of the universe are the two basic facts of human existence Camus might defend himself by saying that these assertions do not come from any positive knowledge about the nature of the world, but are rather all that is left over when he denies himself any positive knowledge The absurd is our fundamental relationship with the world because it does not rely on claims to know anything about the world beyond what is given to us Is it D

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